#BlogTour! #Review – Stasi 77 by David Young (@djy_writer) @ZaffreBooks

Stasi Blog Tour Graphic
Final blog tour post of the day, and it’s another book published Zaffre Books, ‘Stasi 77’ by David Young. Many thanks to Zaffree for the blog tour invite and ARC. Here his my review:

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A secret State. A dark conspiracy. A terrible crime.

Karin Müller of the German Democratic Republic’s People’s Police is called to a factory in the east of the country. A man has been murdered – bound and trapped as a fire burned nearby, slowly suffocating him. But who is he? Why was he targeted? Could his murderer simply be someone with a grudge against the factory’s nationalisation, as Müller’s Stasi colleagues insist? Why too is her deputy Werner Tilsner behaving so strangely?

As more victims surface, it becomes clear that there is a cold-blooded killer out there taking their revenge. Soon Müller begins to realise that in order to solve these terrible crimes, she will need to delve into the region’s dark past. But are the Stasi really working with her on this case? Or against her?

For those who really run this Republic have secrets they would rather remain uncovered. And they will stop at nothing to keep them that way . . .

What does TWG think?

Don’t make the mistake that I did! ‘Stasi 77’ is best read once you have read the other books in the series, and I’m speaking from experience as I didn’t quite realise until it was too late that it was part of a series. I did learn the hard way and unfortunately it did alter my experience regarding the entire thing.

David Young was a new author for me, one I was looking forward to getting stuck into! Even though an error was made and I wasn’t able to enjoy the book 100 percent, I could not fault the author on his ability to create a suspenseful storyline. I was very impressed by the intensity of the characters actions and their own individual journeys, even though there was a lot more to their personalities that I hadn’t found out yet.

The historical element to ‘Stasi 77’ made for a shocking read, but one which I lapped up like a cat with a saucer of milk. The uniqueness of the history versus crime was a true experience, and I did enjoy the chilling escapades and rollercoaster ride of a read.

I am looking forward to starting from the very beginning with David Young’s novels, as I thought that his writing style is extremely engaging and highly gripping.

Buy now from Amazon.

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#BlogTour! #Review – The Daughters of Ironbridge by Mollie Walton (@RebeccaMascull) @ZaffreBooks

The Daughters of Ironbridge Blog Tour (1)
Blog tour two of the day is where TWG gets to step back in time with ‘The Daughters of Ironbridge’ by Mollie Walton. Bit ironic for Easter Sunday is it not! Thank you to Zaffre Books for the blog tour invite and ARC. Here is my review:

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Anny Woodvine’s family has worked at the ironworks for as long as she can remember. The brightest child in her road and the first in her family to learn to read, Anny has big dreams. So, when she is asked to run messages for the King family, she grabs the opportunity with both hands.

Margaret King is surrounded by privilege and wealth. But behind closed doors, nothing is what it seems. When Anny arrives, Margaret finds her first ally and friend. Together they plan to change their lives.

But as disaster looms over the ironworks, Margaret and Anny find themselves surrounded by secrets and betrayal. Can they hold true to each other and overcome their fate? Or are they destined to repeat the mistakes of the past?

What does TWG think?

Got to love a saga! ‘The Daughters of Ironbridge’ is such a special read. In no time at all, the author allowed me to lose myself in the lives of such three-dimensional, well thought out characters such as Anny and Margaret. Set in the mid 1800’s, Mollie Walton takes her readers on a journey back in time where society and class were completely different to they are now. Not only that, readers are given an insight into the ironworks, and just how much hard work it took for those who worked there.

Mollie Walton makes her characters come alive in such a seamless and flawless manner, at times making me feel as though I was sitting on the characters shoulders like a little parrot, following their every move.

I was moved by the community spirit and the strength of the friendship between Margaret and Anny, two very different people whose lives may have been bound by the strength of their friendship, yet their class couldn’t have been more chalk and cheese if it tried.

There is a lot of storyline to sink your teeth into, just like most saga’s, so if you’re into reading books which give you more than your moneys worth, and then some, ‘The Daughters of Ironbridge’ will no doubt tick several boxes.

I was so pleased to see that this is the first book in a trilogy – roll on more is what I say!

An in-depth, powerful and beautifully crafted novel from an author who puts ‘history’ in the word ‘historical’. Brilliant.

Buy now!

#BlogTour! #Extract from ‘Sleep’ by C.L.Taylor (@CallyTaylor) @AvonBooksUK

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It’s TWG’s turn to ‘sleep’…or not! I have an extract of C.L.Taylor’s new novel, Sleep, for you all today! Many thanks to Avon Books for the blog tour invite. I have everything crossed that I can get to this soon!!

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All Anna wants is to be able to sleep. But crushing insomnia, terrifying night terrors and memories of that terrible night are making it impossible. If only she didn’t feel so guilty…

To escape her past, Anna takes a job at a hotel on the remote Scottish island of Rum, but when seven guests join her, what started as a retreat from the world turns into a deadly nightmare.

Each of the guests have a secret, but one of them is lying – about who they are and why they’re on the island. There’s a murderer staying in the Bay View hotel. And they’ve set their sights on Anna.

Seven strangers. Seven secrets. One deadly lie.

Someone’s going to sleep and never wake up…

Extract.

Maybe I shouldn’t go for the marketing director job. Maybe I should give up work, leave Alex and move to the countryside. I could go freelance, buy a small cottage and a dog, take long walks and fill my lungs with fresh air. There are days at work when I feel I can’t breathe, and not just because of the pollution. The air’s thinner at the top of the ladder and I find myself clinging to it, terrified I might fall. Freddy would love it if I did.
Squeak. Swish. Squeak. Swish.
Get. Home. Get. Home.

The hail is falling heavily now, bouncing off the windscreen and rolling off the bonnet. Someone snorts in their sleep, making me jolt, before they fall silent again. I’ve been driving behind the car in front for a couple of miles now and we’re both keeping to a steady seventy miles an hour. It’s too dangerous to overtake, and besides, there’s something comforting about following their red fog lights at a safe distance.
Squeak. Swish. Squeak. Swish.
Get. Home. Get. Home.

I hear a loud, exaggerated yawn. It’s Freddy, stretching his arms above his head and shifting in his seat. ‘Anna? Can we stop at the services? I need the loo.’ ‘We’re nearly in London.’ ‘Can you turn the heating down?’ he adds as I glance from the rear-view mirror to the road. ‘I’m sweating like a pig.’
‘I can’t. The heater on the windscreen’s not working and it keeps fogging up.’
‘I’m going to open a window then.’
‘Freddy, don’t!’
Anger surges through me as he twists in his seat and reaches for the button.
‘Freddy, LEAVE IT!’

It happens in the blink of an eye. One moment there is a car in front of me, red tail lights a warm, comforting glow, the next the car is gone, there’s a blur of lights and the blare of a horn – frantic and desperate – and then I’m thrown to the left as the car tips to the side and all I can hear is crunching metal, breaking glass, screaming, and then nothing at all.

Buy now from Amazon.

#BlogBlitz! #Review – Jay-Jay the Supersonic Bus by Sue Wickstead (@JayJayBus) @RaRaResources

Delighted to be joining in with the one day blog blitz for ‘Jay-Jay the Supersonic Bus’ by Sue Wickstead. Many thanks to RaRaResources for having me involved, and for the ARC. Here is my review:

Jay-Jay the bus is rescued from the dirty scrap yard, where he was sadly gathering dust and cobwebs. Feeling nervous yet excited, he is taken to an airport where he is magically transformed into a ‘Playbus’ full of toys, games and adventure.

A fictional tale based on a real-life bus ‘Supersonic’, which flew in the imaginations of the many young children who visited it.

What does TWG think?

As a fan of buses (looking at not riding on as she gets travel sick), my five year old daughter was so excited to read about Jay-Jay. Shes at the stage where she is able to read certain words, so I am sure you can guess just how proud she was with this book.

I may be an adult but even I enjoyed this lovely little book, and its illustrations are just so fun and colourful! I think that this is an idea book for both adult and children alike. A very magic and enchanting read, guaranteed to keep your child entertained time and time again.

Buy from Amazon UK

Buy from Sue’s website.

About the author.

I am a teacher and an author and have currently written six children’s picture books with a bus theme.

For over 20 years, alongside my teaching career, I worked with a Children’s Charity, The Bewbush Playbus Association, which led me to write a photographic history book about it.

I soon found that many children had never been on a bus before, let alone a ‘Playbus’ and they wanted to know more. I decided to write a fictional tale about the bus, his number plate JJK261 gave him his name.

‘Jay-Jay the Supersonic Bus,’ came out in print in 2014. It is the story behind the original bus and is his journey from a scrap-yard to being changed into a playbus for children to play in. From Fact to fiction the bus journey continued.

This story has now been followed by five more picture books.

I also undertake events and author bookings and love to share the story. There are also a few more stories in the writing process, with links to real events and buses.

The story has been read in many schools in the south-East of England, where I teach as a cover teacher, it is always well received and certainly different.

#BlogTour! #Review – #TheLibrarianOfAuschwitz by Antonio Iturbe (tr: Lilit Zekulin Thwaites) @Tonilturbe @EburyPublishing @PenguinUKBooks @Tr4cyF3nt0n

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Third tour of the day is for a book which I am humbled to be hosting on TWG today; ‘The Librarian of Auschwitz’ by Antonio Iturbe, translated by Lilit Zekulin Thwaites. Thank you to Tracy Fenton for the blog tour invite, and thank you to Ebury, Penguin Books for the ARC. Here is my review:

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‘It wasn’t an extensive library. In fact, it consisted of eight books and some of them were in poor condition. But they were books. In this incredibly dark place, they were a reminder of less sombre times, when words rang out more loudly than machine guns…’

Fourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezín ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious books the prisoners have managed to smuggle past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the secret librarian of Auschwitz, responsible for the safekeeping of the small collection of titles, as well as the ‘living books’ – prisoners of Auschwitz who know certain books so well, they too can be ‘borrowed’ to educate the children in the camp.

But books are extremely dangerous. They make people think. And nowhere are they more dangerous than in Block 31 of Auschwitz, the children’s block, where the slightest transgression can result in execution, no matter how young the transgressor…

What does TWG think?

I really have no idea how to review this book to be honest. It’s not that I didn’t like it because, as weird as this sounds given the topic of the book, I did really enjoy it. I mean, this book is about the prisoners of Auschwitz and the Nazis. I don’t feel qualified enough to comment on the devastations of that time, does that make sense? Obviously I am going to, but I apologise in advance if I just ramble!

‘The Librarian of Auschwitz’ is based on the true story of one of the prisoners in the camp, Dita Kraus, written in the book as ‘Dita Adler’. There are some parts of the storyline which have been fictionalised – good luck to those trying to work out which bits are which! Of course, if you googled every single thing in the book, I’m sure the fictional pieces will jump out at you! I did end up googling some things whilst I was reading the book, not because I wanted to double-check that it was factually correct, but more so because I wanted to see the faces of the imbeciles who led people towards their deaths. Not just a small handful of people, not that that would make it any easier to swallow, but an estimated 1 million people. ONE MILLION!

At times I struggled to believe what I was reading. The fact that the SS soldiers and the Kapo were so blasé about what they were doing, sent chills up my spine. What possessed them to get caught up in Hitlers dirty work? How could they live with themselves knowing that they had sent innocent people, including young children, to their deaths? At one point in the book, the story described just how one young child was sticking their tongue out at a solider as they were being put into the chamber. Heartbreaking.

I was in awe at Dita’s strength as, for such a young girl, she clearly had to grow up very quickly to be able to get through the things that she did. She saw people die right before her very eyes. She protected her mother from a situation which could have turned out a lot worse if she hadn’t. She made friends with children one day, only to hear that they have been removed from the camp and sent to a chamber. No way of saying goodbye. No way of protecting people who came to be like an extended family. Dita’s hands were tied, and at times that was quite literal.

Just like the title suggests, there was a library in Block 31. Hang on, let me correct that. There was a SECRET library because, if prisoners were found with books on them, it warranted a death sentence. Death. Because they read a book. I’m literally shaking my head here. And, seeing as Dita ended up being the librarian for Block 31, and responsible for the collection of the five books in the block, she had literally put herself in the firing line knowing full well what the outcome would be should she be caught. Yet her love for books, according to her, was worth playing with death for.

Alongside Dita’s journey, we also follow the lives of several other figures such as Fredy Hirsch, leader of Block 31, and Dr Mengele, a man who liked conducting inhumane experiments on the prisoners….just because he could. There are a lot of other historical names noted throughout this book, a lot of which don’t deserve their names in print, but unfortunately it’s an important part of our history.

Before reading ‘The Librarian of Auschwitz’, I had obviously heard about the gas chambers and such, but I had never read a book with Auschwitz at the forefront of its storyline. I am glad that I finally decided to read about the devastation of those years, and finding out little details which helped the prisoners during that time, such as coming together and singing songs on the way to the chamber. Unity at such a dark time.

I don’t think I will ever understand the why’s and wherefores about this particular subject, but, thanks to Antonia Iturbe’s outstanding writing, I am determined to broaden my knowledge. It’s a shame that me doing that won’t change the situation for the thousands and thousands of people who lost their life, but it’s a small way of honouring the memory of the survivors.

‘The Librarian of Auschwitz’ moved me, devastated me, and left me utterly broken. Nothing at all compared to what people endured at the hands of the Nazis I know. It goes without saying that Antonio Iturbe has written a heart wrenching novel, simple because you would need to be made of stone to not be moved by even a little detail in this book. I am blown away by the amount of research it must have taken in order to complete this book. I, like I said at the start, am blown away by Dita Kraus, especially as she retraced her steps many years later.

One of my top books of all time, ‘The Librarian of Auschwitz’ is an emotional, harrowing novel which details some of the heartbreaking events from Auschwitz. A book which I will never, ever forget.

Buy now from Amazon

#BlogTour! #Review – #GardenOfLostAndFound by Harriet Evans (@HarrietEvans) @HeadlinePG @AnneCater

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Second blog tour of the day and what a beautiful cover it has; The Garden of Lost and Found’ by Harriet Evans. Many thanks, as always, to Anne for the blog tour invite, and to Headline for the ARC. Here is my review for my stop on the tour today:

Garden of Lost and Found Cover

Nightingale House, 1919. Liddy Horner discovers her husband, the world-famous artist Sir Edward Horner, burning his best-known painting The Garden of Lost and Found days before his sudden death.

Nightingale House was the Horner family’s beloved home – a gem of design created to inspire happiness – and it was here Ned painted TheGarden of Lost and Found, capturing his children on a perfect day, playing in the rambling Eden he and Liddy made for them.

One magical moment. Before it all came tumbling down…

When Ned and Liddy’s great-granddaughter Juliet is sent the key to Nightingale House, she opens the door onto a forgotten world. The house holds its mysteries close but she is in search of answers. For who would choose to destroy what they love most? Whether Ned’s masterpiece – or, in Juliet’s case, her own children’s happiness.

Something shattered this corner of paradise. But what?

What does TWG think?

After reading Harriet Evan’s previous novel, ‘The Wildflowers’, I was so eager to read more of the authors books. My excitement for ‘The Garden of Lost and Found’ was through the roof!

If you haven’t yet picked up a novel by Harriet Evans, you are missing out on a whole other world. A home away from home if you will. The outline of this novel is similar to the authors others in terms of the dual timeline and split narratives which, if you’re not used to reading books like that, it can be a little bit confusing until you get into the swing of things.

‘The Garden of Lost and Found’, in my opinion, starts off exceptionally slow and requires a bit of patience before the real gem of the storyline became clear. Evans is exceptional at setting the scene in her novels, which is why having patience will be highly rewarded the more of the novel you read.

Juliet’s life isn’t going to plan. She has one more chance (according to her) to sort herself out before she alienates her children for good. Her intentions are there, but the delivery leaves a lot to be desired but, seeing as Juliet’s children are indeed young, they won’t quite understand the logic behind why their mum has decided to do what she has done.

I adored the change in dynamics throughout the storyline, putting family drama’s and multiple generations in the spotlight beautifully. I thought that the story gave off such a magical and enticing vibe – this is such a special, special read and definitely one of a kind.

I was blown away by the authors beautifully descriptive writing and the way she made her characters come alive and steal your heart. Another wonderful, enchanting novel from Harriet Evans.

Buy now from Amazon

#BlogTour! #Review – Two Little Girls by Frances Vick (@franvicksays) @Bookouture

Many thanks to Bookouture for the blog tour invite and ARC. Here is my review of ‘Two Little Girls’ by Frances Vick.

An innocent girl is taken. The killer confesses.
But that’s not the whole story. That’s not even the beginning…

It’s 1985 and the disappearance of ten-year-old Lisa Cook shocks the nation. Her best friend, Kirsty, traumatised and fearful, gives evidence that helps to put the Cook family’s lodger behind bars.
…But what if Kirsty made a mistake?
Now, decades later, Kirsty leaves a life she loves to move back to the hometown she hates – tortured by her memories, she’s determined to finally uncover the truth about what happened to Lisa that day. But someone is waiting for her there, someone close to her family. Someone who is hoping to finish off a job that was started years ago…

What does TWG think?

You can’t fault Frances Vick on her insightly way of getting into her characters minds. I mean, just look at Kirsty for example. She, alongside her best friend, Lisa, were at the heart of a devastating event which changed the lives of those around them forever, and still the author got into their minds and transferred their thoughts onto paper in a really clever and chilling way.

However, I am on the fence about the book in its entirety. The twisted element to the storyline definitely kept me hooked, but the fact the storyline didn’t seem to go anywhere in the latter half of the book was a bit of a ‘huh’ moment.

‘Two Little Girls’ is a devious read, and it contains topics which will get the readers talking, such as autism and vaccines. A sore spot for some (the vaccine thing), yet it’s one which will give the book it’s time in the spotlight.

This isn’t my most favourite of books by Frances Vick, but I still enjoyed the complex relationships between the characters in this read. Very impressive.

Buy now!

#BlogTour! #Review – Call Me Star Girl by Louise Beech (@LouiseWriter) @OrendaBooks @AnneCater #CallMeStarGirl

This lady needs no introduction, so, all I will say is I am HONOURED to be hosting the bird who wrote ‘Call Me Star Girl’ on the blog today. Huge thanks to Anne and Orenda Books for the blog tour invite, and to Jen for buying me a signed copy! Here is my review:

Stirring up secrets can be deadly … especially if they’re yours


Pregnant Victoria Valbon was brutally murdered in an alley three weeks ago – and her killer hasn’t been caught.
Tonight is Stella McKeever’s final radio show. The theme is secrets. You tell her yours, and she’ll share some of hers.

Stella might tell you about Tom, a boyfriend who likes to play games, about the mother who abandoned her, now back after fourteen years. She might tell you about the perfume bottle with the star-shaped stopper, or about her father …

What Stella really wants to know is more about the mysterious man calling the station … who says he knows who killed Victoria, and has proof.
Tonight is the night for secrets, and Stella wants to know everything…

What does TWG think?

‘Starrrrrrrr, that’s what they call meeee.’

Got to love Kiki Dee!

Wow, wow, wow – what a striking read. I finished this book in the early hours of the morning a couple of days ago, with my eyes glistening with unshed tears for our Star Girl. I was bereft. Empowered. Emotionally drained. I was overcome with feelings that I struggled to file away. ‘Call Me Star Girl’ isn’t book with Radio 2 at the core. It’s a book which takes both the readers, and the characters, on a journey they will never, ever forget.

How far would you go for love? I don’t mean washing your partner’s soiled pants, or clearing up their puke when they’re poorly. I’m talking about things a lot more complicated than that. Would you move heaven and Earth for your one and only, refusing to look anywhere other than the ground that they walk on? See, Stella showed love as an obsession. An obsession which clouded her judgement and looking at her life through rose coloured glasses. They say that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree – just look at Stella’s mother for example. I won’t divulge why, but it will all make sense once you come across that particular character.

Stella’s love life isn’t the only concerning thing in this book. Nope. Someone has lost their life. An act of revenge? Or an accident? Stella, thanks to her job in the radio station, hears on the news reports regarding that devastating night and, thankfully, she can look at the situation from afar. Not for long though. How does the death of Victoria Valbon, concern Stella? And why is someone being a smart alec?

Atmospheric would be one word to describe this particular storyline, but in all honesty, I think the words ‘bloody outstanding’ work a lot better. Louise Beech left me in a predicament I had never found myself in before, thanks to a storyline which, if you looked in the dictionary under the word ‘unique’, you’ll find that the definition is ‘Call Me Star Girl – Louise Beech’.

This is a story that highlights the beauty of books. A story which had me so overcome with emotion, my tears refused to flow. A story so unique, its left an imprint on my soul. Louise Beech is an exceptionally talented, majestic, and enchanting author who writes with incredible passion, poise, and sheer brilliance.

One of the best books I think I have ever read, ‘Call Me Star Girl’ is everything that’s right with the literary world.

Buy now!

#BlogTour! #Review – Love and Other Things to Live For by Louise Leverett (@louiseleverett) @ninadouglaspr @hqstories

Are you feeling the lurve? Last blog post of the day is my review of Louise Leverett’s, ‘Love and Other Things To Live For’. Many thanks to HQStories for the blog tour invite and ARC. Here is my review:

Jessica Wood is an aspiring photographer living in London. She’s had her heart broken, and her friends have pieced it back together again.

But across the neon lights of Soho, in the smell of alcohol and cigarette smoke, on every night bus, in every song, every time she tries to forget: she remembers him.

Now, in a battle between the past and the future, choosing between having a life and making a living, finding her feet or spreading her wings, Jessica must ask herself: who is she really living for?

What does TWG think?

We’ve all been broken hearted, right? Unable to hear a song in fear of ugly crying down the veg aisle in Tesco, or smelling an odour which reminds you of the best date ever where you ate hula hoops and wore a Haribo gummy ring on your finger, you know, just to see. But what happens now? How do you move on from the person who you thought was the one? How do you remember to live your life for you, and only you?

Poor Jessica has found herself in that predicament. She has no idea how to live her life anymore, and shes too scared to spread her wings in case her heart gets broken again. Thankfully Jessica had a support network to help her on her way, and show her that sometimes you just need to love yourself before you can love other things.

This was a nifty little read. It didn’t blow me away, I’m not going to lie, but the premise of the storyline definitely gave me food for thought. I think that the author has written a modern day tale which a lot of readers will be able to relate to. I loved how the concept of the book and Jessica’s journey portrayed certain life events in a way which young adults may take notice of and look up to.

I’m I’m saying that this novel is specifically for young adults as such, but if something like this was around when I was at the age of being confused by the crossroads of life, I would have welcomed Jessica’s story in a heartbeat.

A warm, enjoyable and relatable read.

Buy now!

#BlogTour! #Review – Final Betryal by Patricia Gibney (@trisha460) @Bookouture

Many congratulations to Patricia Gibney on the publication of ‘Final Betrayal’! I am delighted to be kicking off the blog tour with a review – many thanks to Bookouture for the tour invite and ARC.

‘She lifted the flap of the envelope and pulled out the single white page. As she opened it up she stared, open mouthed. Four words were typed on the page. I am watching you.’

When Amy Whyte and Penny Brogan leave a local nightclub in the early hours of Sunday morning and don’t arrive home, their families are beside themselves with worry. Conor Dowling has just been released from prison, a man full of hatred for Amy, the girl who put him behind bars in the first place.

The case is given to Detective Lottie Parker, when the girls’ blood-soaked bodies are found, days later, in a derelict squat. Chillingly, both girls are clutching silver coins in their hands – what message is this killer leaving behind? All the signs point to Conor but his alibi is water tight.

As Lottie examines Penny and Amy’s final days alive in a desperate search for clues, two more girls are found stabbed to death in a luxury apartment complex. Caught up in what is fast becoming her toughest case yet, Lottie is unaware that somebody is watching her every move.

Then Lottie’s two daughters, Katie and Chloe suddenly disappear from the town centre. Terrified that the killer has her girls, the stakes have never been higher for Lottie.

But as Lottie puts everything on the line to find her daughters and solve the case, she’s about to find herself in terrible danger – someone has a personal axe to grind with her and they know the best way to get to her is to hurt the ones she loves the most.

What does TWG think?

Book six already? How the hell did that happen!! I seem to say this quite often when it comes to book serials, but it’s still true nonetheless – you don’t NEED to read the books in order if you’re new to the series. Each book can be read fine on their own, however, because they are all brilliant, I do suggest you read them all. That’s just me though!

Lottie Parker is back and she still hasn’t managed to bring some good luck with her! How much rubbish can one person, and one family, deal with?! In ‘Final Betrayal’, Lottie starts off feeling as though she has finally got her feet firmly on the ground and is hopeful for the future, a feeling she hasn’t felt for a very long time. You know what I’m going to say next, right? Exactly – someone comes along and bursts her bubble, and yes, she is in trouble! But is she the only one?

Patricia Gibney is outstanding at creating a suspenseful storyline which made me feel nervous from the bottom of my spine. Sounds weird, I know, but it happens! There is a lot of uncertainty to sink your teeth into in this latest installment, and the intensity gets richer with every passing page.

Full of red herrings, thrilling circumstances, and dark and devious characters; ‘Final Betrayal’ is an atmospheric, twisted read and I LOVED every second of it. Patricia Gibney is a legend!

Buy now!