#BlogTour! #Review – Strangers On A Bridge by Louise Mangos (@LouiseMangos) @HQDigitalUK

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Second blog tour for HQ today, this time I have the pleasure of closing the blog tour for Louise Mangos and ‘Strangers On A Bridge’. Big thanks to the team at HQ for the blog tour invite and the ARC of the book. Here is my review:

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She should never have saved him.

When Alice Reed goes on her regular morning jog in the peaceful Swiss Alps, she doesn’t expect to save a man from suicide. But she does. And it is her first mistake.

Adamant they have an instant connection, Manfred’s charming exterior grows darker and his obsession with Alice grows stronger.

In a country far from home, where the police don’t believe her, the locals don’t trust her and even her husband questions the truth about Manfred, Alice has nowhere to turn.

To what lengths will Alice go to protect herself and her family?

What does TWG think?

I really didn’t know what to think of the storyline at first. My opinion about Alice’s actions was surrounded by a big question mark as, whilst I thought it was admirable, I couldn’t help but wonder why she did it. Maybe it was her job which gave her the nudge to take that step towards a stranger? Maybe it was her own conscience which enable her to put one foot in front of the other towards a stranger? I don’t know. Personally, the concept of suicide is extremely cut throat due to my own dad committing suicide two years ago, and the fact that someone got saved from that was pretty surreal.  But honestly, how many of us would do that for a stranger? Our first instincts may be to say a big, fat yes, but would that outcome change if we were faced with that choice one day whilst we were minding our own business?

I expected the stranger’s reaction to be what it was, and I also had an inkling that they thought they were going to find their new BFF in Alice. However, what I didn’t foresee was the extent of the stranger’s actions – they seemed to go from nought to one hundred in the blink of an eye! I was very impressed by the intricate details that were woven flawlessly into the storyline, there were times where I even found myself thinking ‘errrrrrr come again?’. Unfortunately the stranger did in fact, come again, but the longer he had Alice in sight, the more determined the stranger seemed to become.

I probably shouldn’t say this, but the stranger’s personality intrigued me greatly as I just wanted to delve into his psyche to find out the root of his actions, that’s even if he knew them himself.

The more the story progressed, the more I became accustom to the rollercoaster ride that was Alice’s life. She became so…what’s the word…obsessed with the stranger, her logical thinking was well and truly clouded. Did she bring on the family rift herself? Or did she end up unknowingly becoming the person she tries to stop her clients from becoming?

I loved the psychological aspect to ‘Strangers On The Bridge’ as it is a subject that greatly interests me, so I was very engrossed in how the author managed to make that theme the forefront of her storyline as though she woke up one day and decided to have a blueberry muffin instead of a chocolate one. It was made out not to be a big deal, even though it most definitely WAS a big deal and for that, Louise Mangos’ goes up in my estimations dramatically.

Overall I thought that ‘Strangers On A Bridge’ was a gritty, engaging, and psychologically addictive debut novel, which was written in a way that made me sit up and take notice. Very, very promising – I am rather intrigued to see what Louise Mangos’ brings out next!

Buy now from Amazon

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#BlogTour! #Review – In Bloom by C.J.Skuse (@CJSkuse) @HQStories

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It may be raining in places but, thanks to C.J.Skuse, something is definitely ‘In Bloom’! Maybe a few sweet pea’s or something, I don’t know! Anyway, I am delighted to be reviewing ‘In Bloom’ as part of the blog tour organised by HQStories. Big thanks to the team for the blog tour invite and the ARC. Here is my review:

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If only they knew the real truth. It should be my face on those front pages. My headlines. I did those things, not him. I just want to stand on that doorstep and scream it: IT WAS ME. ME. ME. ME. ME!

Rhiannon Lewis has successfully fooled the world and framed her cheating fiancé Craig for the depraved and bloody killing spree she committed. She should be ecstatic that she’s free.

Except for one small problem. She’s pregnant with her ex lover’s child. The ex-lover she only recently chopped up and buried in her in-laws garden. And as much as Rhiannon wants to continue making her way through her kill lists, a small voice inside is trying to make her stop.

But can a killer’s urges ever really be curbed?

What does TWG think?

Don’t shout at me, but I read ‘In Bloom’ without reading the prequel to this, ‘Sweetpea’. I know, I know – I’m bad!  Thankfully I was able to read ‘In Bloom’ perfectly fine without reading the previous novel, however, I would recommend reading ‘Sweetpea’ as there were references to the flower in this book and I had no idea how or why Rhiannon was associated to them.

Having heard so much about ‘Sweetpea’, I was so excited to delve into C.J.Skuse’s latest novel. I didn’t really have any expectations in mind before I started reading, but even if I did, they would have been completely blown out of the water anyway!

I couldn’t help laughing out loud throughout the entire novel, and I couldn’t help feeling quite bad about my laughter considering the nature of the storyline! Please note – I wasn’t laughing at the theme’s, I was laughing at how Rhiannon was portrayed, her actions, as well as the stuff that flew out of her mouth. I would say that I have found a new favourite line, but I think that may be a spoiler. It does contain several ‘fs’, so I will leave it up to you to find that line in the book yourself. Put it this way, I was glad I put my cup of tea down before I turned the page otherwise I would have spat it out laughing!

‘In Bloom’ is blooming hilarious and it really shouldn’t be, but it is, and it works! Don’t get me wrong, the antics of several of the characters was very cut throat, gruesome, and rather, ermm……twisted, but the way in which C.J.Skuse delivered those actions in such a hilariously dark, gritty and fiery manner, made me feel less guilty for laughing at axe’s and things….

Like I said above, I had no expectations regarding ‘In Bloom’ at all. I had a feeling that I would need to read the book with an open mind after what I had seen on social media, so I did and, because of that, I was able to appreciate the storyline in its entirety without any preconceptions of the contents.

There were moments whilst reading this novel where I felt like I shouldn’t be liking it as it is everything that I’m not, however, that is also the reason why I really did enjoy ‘In Bloom’ as it IS unique. It IS memorable. It IS one of those books that you will either love or hate, bit like marmite and seeing as I love marmite, I am so thrilled that I ended up loving this book.

‘In Bloom’ is a novel that, if you had given it to me several years back, I would have said that it was completely out of my comfort zone. But now? I can honestly say that this is an outrageously hilarious, twisted, dark, shocking novel which left my sides aching with laughter and my mind going ‘what the begonia did I just read?!’.

I have everything crossed that Rhiannon comes back again as I have a feeling that her story is far from over!! What a book!

Buy now from Amazon

#BlogTour! #Extract – 11 Missed Calls by Elisabeth Carpenter (@LibbyCPT) @AvonBooksUK

11 Missed Calls Blog Tour FINAL
Today for my stop on the ’11 Missed Calls’ blog tour, I will be sharing an extract from Elisabeth Carpenter’s new book. Enjoy!

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Here are two things I know about my mother:
1. She had dark hair, like mine.
2. She wasn’t very happy at the end.

Anna has always believed that her mother, Debbie, died 30 years ago on the night she disappeared.

But when her father gets a strange note, she realises that she’s never been told the full story of what happened that night on the cliff.

Confused and upset, Anna turns to her husband Jack – but when she finds a love letter from another woman in his wallet, she realises there’s no-one left to help her, least of all her family.

And then a body is found…

Extract.

I grab my laptop and take it into the living room. I still don’t know what to say in my reply to Debbie. It is too important to just fire off a few words when I have a whole lifetime to write about. She won’t be expecting a message from me, but I doubt Monica or Dad have replied yet. They would have told me if they had, though I’m not sure of anything these days.

‘Just ask to meet,’ says Jack, reading my mind. ‘You don’t have to write an essay. If she is who she says she is, then you’ll find out soon enough.’

Perhaps it is as simple as that. There is a tiny part of me – self-preservation, again – that tells me not to give too much away in an email. She must earn the right to hear my news. The least she could do is meet me.

I click on the email forwarded by Dad. I already know her words off by heart, but I still read it. ‘The memories of shells and sweet things …’ No one else could know about that.

I type out the reply before I can think about it, and press send.

Buy now from Amazon

#BlogBlitz! #Review – The Affair by Sheryl Browne (@SherylBrowne) @Bookouture


Day two of Sheryl Browne’s blog blitz is here!! I am trying my hardest not to pee in excitement as I get to share my review of ‘The Affair’. What an absolute BELTER of a book this is. Honestly, you won’t be disappointed! If you don’t believe me with that alone, you can read my review below. Big thanks to Bookouture for the blitz invite and the ARC.


The moment she opened her eyes, she knew everything had changed. The stale taste of alcohol; her uneasy stomach. She looked at her husband sleeping peacefully, and knew she would never tell anyone what happened last night.

You will think you know what happened to Alicia that night.

You will see a desperate wife, lying to her husband.

You will watch a charming lover, trying to win her back.

You will judge her, just like everyone else.

You will assume you know what happens next. But everything you think you know about the past, the relationships, what drives Alicia and her husband to lie… is wrong.

What does TWG think?

Seriously folks, what the FUDGE! Oh….my…actual…flipping…goodness! I just….HAH. Apologies, I will try to fill this review with proper sentences, honestly. I’m just struggling to get my head around what I have recently read. ‘The Affair’ isn’t a novel that will give you a bit of a headfunk then leave you to finish your cornflakes in peace. No. Completely the opposite in fact! Not only did my head seem content with going at the speed of light, every time I turned the page of the book, the storyline decided to take over my thoughts and if I didn’t sleep properly before now, I certainly didn’t last night!

Straight away the author drops a metaphoric bomb on the book. No joke. There’s no easing in the storyline, no holding your hand and preparing you for situations later on down the line. None of that. If you’re wanting a read which keeps you on the edge of your seat from the word ‘go’, turns your spine into a tingling mess, and completely rips your emotions apart, you certainly won’t go wrong with ‘The Affair’.

I was aware that Sheryl Browne was good at tearing me apart after reading her previous novel, but this one is a whole new ball game. It didn’t just tear me apart, it hung me out to dry and left me completely and utterly broken. I wish I was being overdramatic but I’m actually not. Browne has outdone herself with the intense depth, cleverly crafted storyline, and copious amounts of ‘what ifs’, ‘whodunit’, ‘whys’ and goodness knows what else. Having read a lot of psychological thrillers already this year, it is taking a lot to impress me. That said, Browne clearly had no problem whatsoever in impressing me with ‘The Affair’, and I am still blown away by the hard-hitting words my mind digested.

The only thing I would say as a slight irk, is that I found Alicia an extremely weak character, even when she was thrown into situations which required copious amounts of strength personally, as well as a lot of strength involving her family. However, it certainly helped matters that her character was supported by a very three dimensional, secretive and uncertain man, aka her husband. I say secretive not because of the fact he was hiding things, but more to do with the fact his emotions were kept under lock and key. Well, sometimes it felt as though his emotions were triple locked but lets not be pedantic!

It is abundantly clear that I absolutely loved ‘The Affair’ and, given the nature of the storyline itself, I probably shouldn’t have as it completely broke my heart as well – clearly the signs of a very, very, VERY good novel.

A twisty, dark, emotive, addictive, and utterly brilliant novel from Sheryl Browne. This author is one to watch and I intend to stalk her and her books in the nicest way possible….

Buy now!

About the author.

Sheryl Browne brings you powerful psychological thriller and contemporary fiction. Sheryl’s latest psychological thriller THE AFFAIR – the second of a three-book deal – comes to you from fabulous BOOKOUTURE. A member of the Crime Writers’ Association and the Romantic Novelists’ Association, and previously writing for award winning Choc Lit, Sheryl has several books published and two short stories in Birmingham City University anthologies, where she completed her MA in Creative Writing.

So why does Sheryl write in two genres? Quoting E. L. Doctorow, Sheryl says: “Writing a novel is like driving a car at night. You can only see as far as your headlights…” This she thinks sums up a writer’s journey, you never quite know where you are going until you get there. You might start with an outline, but a strong character will always divert from the plot. If Sheryl’s not sure where a character is going, she simply has to trust him to show her the way. Plus, according to one reviewer, she also has a scary insight into the mind of a psychopath. 

To find out more about Sheryl, go to www.sherylbrowne.com

#BlogTour! #Review – The Girl I Used to Be by Mary Torjussen (@MaryTorjussen) @AnneCater @HeadlinePG #RandomThingsTours

Day two of the blog tour for #TheGirlIUsedToBe, and I, TWG, have the honour of sharing my review of Mary Torjussen’s book. Big thank you, as always, to Anne from Random Things Tours for the blog tour invite, and huge thanks to publisher, Headline, for the review copy. Here is my review:

How can you hide your mistakes when you don’t know what they are?

Gemma Brogan needs a break from her life.

A work event looks the ideal chance to get away. And a friendly new client seems like the perfect gentleman when he joins Gemma for an innocent dinner . . .

But the next morning she has no memory of how the night ended and he has vanished into thin air.

Suddenly, Gemma is plunged into a twisted nightmare she can’t control. To protect her future, and her family, she will have to confront shocking secrets from her past – and the truth about the girl she used to be.

What does TWG think?

I am quite sure that a lot of you reading this review right now have had at least one hangover before, right? If that is the case, imagine feeling as though you have the proof something has happened, but without having the actual proof to cement it. I know, that sounds quite confusing doesn’t it? Lets look at it a different way. Imagine going out for a walk one day, you run into an old friend, have a bite to eat, and then come home not remembering half of the things you did that day, yet something is brought to your attention from that day out which you have no reason not to take as gospel. But do you? I have never had a hangover, but I do know that brain fog is quite similar and, whilst brain fog isn’t the case for main character, Gemma, there are a lot of things happening in the storyline which make Gemma’s life appear rather uncertain, and Gemma very untrustworthy.

Not remembering what you got up to is quite scary and, believe it or not, actually reading about someone who cannot remember what they got up to is scary as well. You think that, as readers, we would be privy to certain events throughout the storyline, but that isn’t the case here. I hadn’t the foggiest what happened that night apart from what the author wrote about, therefore as soon as Gemma’s journey became more uncertain, I found myself growing increasingly nervous because I kept thinking to myself, ‘did I miss a page out?’ and, ‘have I already forgotten what happened to Gemma?’. It made me quite anxious if I’m honest! Intriguingly anxious, yet also anxious in a rather uncomfortable manner as well.

I cannot fault Mary Torjussen’s story telling, nor can I fault the way in which she keeps her readers on tenterhooks all the way through the novel. Whilst I would usually use the word ‘creepy’ for novels which include ghosts and stalkers etc, I have to say that that word could not be more apt for ‘The Girl I Used To Be’. It’s creepy, it’s edgy, it’s very suspenseful, whilst also making you feel as though you have to second guess every conceivable thing in your own life as well as Gemma’s.

A twisty, suspenseful novel which was full of skeletons and bucketful’s of insecurities – I cannot help but be impressed by what I have read!

Buy now from Amazon

#BlogBlitz! #Review – The Forgotten by Casey Kelleher (@caseykelleher) @Bookouture


Late in the day this may be, but I hadn’t forgotten to post! (See what I did there?!) I’ll see myself out….
Anyway, second and final day of the blog blitz for Casey Kelleher and ‘The Forgotten’, and I am delighted to be sharing my review as part of it. Big thanks, as always, to Bookouture for the blitz invite and the ARC of the book. Here is my review:


The more people you love, the more you have to lose…

Nancy Byrne might be the head of the notorious Byrne crime family, but she’s determined to give her little daughter, Scarlett, the best start possible.

After the death of her beloved father, the notorious gangster Jimmy Byrne, nothing’s stopping Nancy from making money on her own terms – even if she has to combine motherhood with providing for her entire family. But with enemies at their door, she’ll do whatever it takes to protect her loved ones.

But then comes the day when Scarlett goes missing, snatched by a stranger during a trip to the local park, and Nancy’s world is torn apart. Amidst the terror of losing her precious daughter, Nancy is sure of only two things. Someone has taken her daughter … and when she finds them, there’s going to be hell to pay.

Can she find Scarlett – before it’s too late? Or will Nancy’s life of crime come back to haunt her in the worst way possible?

What does TWG think?

If I didn’t wonder what went through the author’s head before now, I certainly do now!! What an explosive, heart in mouth, gut wrenching novel this is! ‘The Forgotten’ may be the third and final book in the ‘Byrne Family’ trilogy, but it certainly packs a punch!

I don’t want to reveal too much in case I accidentally give anything away, however I do urge you to switch off/unplug any phone before you begin Casey Kelleher’s latest release as it requires your undivided attention and, if you’re anything like me, you would be incredibly annoyed if you were to get to the nitty gritty parts of the book and get disturbed by someone telling you that you have had an accident. Y’know, THOSE calls.

There are a lot of unlikeable characters in this book, yet weirdly enough, there are also a few characters who you just can’t help but like. Even if they are amongst the ‘bad guys’. I love Nancy’s persona and her fiery attitude – she certainly knows how to put people in their place! Okay her actions are somewhat questionable, yet she is a character who I just love. She’s one hell of a b…..ch, I love it!

Despite Nancy’s frosty exterior, her softer side was awakened when she had her daughter, Scarlett. However, things don’t always go to plan and when Scarlett went missing, I felt physically sick. I had no idea what was going to happen, but based on the outcomes for other characters in the book, I didn’t hold out much hope. You would need to be made of stone for that part of the storyline not to affect you in some way!

Casey Kelleher never fails to deliver on suspense, grit, powerful situations, and thrilling circumstances. ‘The Forgotten’ is one book that you won’t be forgetting in a hurry what with its cut throat storyline, its rollercoaster themes, and enough grit to cover the length of the M25….twice.

Buy now!

About the author.

Born in Cuckfield, West Sussex, Casey Kelleher grew up as an avid reader and a huge fan of author Martina Cole. 

Whilst working as a beauty therapist and bringing up her three children together with her husband, Casey penned her debut novel Rotten to the Core. Its success meant that she could give up her day job and concentrate on writing full time. 

She has since published Rise and Fall, Heartless, Bad Blood, The Taken, The Promise, The Betrayed, The Broken and her latest release The Forgotten is due for publication on the 7thAugust 2018.

For all news and updates:

www.caseykelleher.co.uk

www.facebook.com/officialcaseykelleher

http://caseykelleher.wordpress.com

Twitter: @caseykelleher

#BlogTour! #Review – Murder at the Book Club by Betsy Reavley (@BetsyReavley) @BloodHoundBook


Day two of the blog tour for ‘Murder at the Book Club’, and the tour bus stops with me, TWG. Big thank you to BloodHoundBooks for the blog tour invite and the ARC of the book. Here is my review:


Imagine nine women meeting. Tea and cake are on the coffee table. They’ve come together to share their love of books. They are friends. They trust each other. It’s a happy gathering. What could be more harmless?

Then scratch the surface and look closer.

One is lonely. One is desperate and one of them is a killer.

When the body of a woman is discovered on a Cambridge common, DCI Barrett and DI Palmer are called in to investigate. But the motive behind the crime isn’t clear… And it all leads back to a book club.

As the lies, volatile friendships and tension among the group rise to the surface, DCI Barrett and DI Palmer must work out the motive and track down a cold-blooded killer. But just when they think they are on the right track, a twist in the case throws them off course…

What does TWG think?

When I think of novels by Betsy Reavley, I think of stories that are very, very cut throat. So, I am sure you could guess my surprise after reading her latest novel, ‘Murder at the Book Club’! No, I don’t mean that in a bad way either. I am awfully surprised at the change in direction Reavley has taken, yet it is a change that most certainly has paid off.

I couldn’t help but feel like I was reading a more intense version of ‘Cluedo’ when it came to the characters! I thought it was very clever using a book club as the setting, especially as people who go to a book club are only usually there for one thing (well, except the cake of course). I loved the ‘whodunnit’ vibe as the author had me engaged with the goings on from the very beginning. ‘Murder at the Book Club’ is a very witty, cunning, and twisty read which will definitely keep you on your toes. I did enjoy the fact that it was slightly less cut throat than Reavley’s previous novels as I got to see another side to the author that I hadn’t seen before.

If you’re in the mood for a book with colourful characters, lies and deceit, and a proper game of ‘guess who’, then this book will be right up your street. I wasn’t sure what to expect before I began reading ‘Murder at the Book Club’, but I have to say that I am rather impressed by the overall result.

Buy now from Amazon

About the author.

Author of The Quiet Ones, The Optician’s Wife, Frailty, Carrion, Beneath the Watery Moon and the poetry collection The Worm in the Bottle. Betsy was born in Hammersmith, London.
As a child she moved around frequently with her family, spending time in London, Provence, Tuscany, Gloucestershire and Cambridgeshire.
She showed a flair for literature and writing from a young age and had a particular interest in poetry, of which she was a prolific consumer and producer.
In her early twenties she moved to Oxford, where she would eventually meet her husband. During her time in Oxford her interests turned from poetry to novels and she began to develop her own unique style of psychological thriller.
Betsy says “I believe people are at their most fascinating when they are faced by the dark side of life. This is what I like to write about.”
Betsy Reavley currently lives in London, with her husband, 2 children, dog, cat and chickens.

#BlogTour! #Review – The Girl in the Letter by Emily Gunnis (@EmilyGunnis) @HeadlinePG @AnneCater @Phoebe_Swinburn


I am so excited to be sharing my review of Emily Gunnis’ outstanding novel, ‘The Girl in the Letter’, which was published in e-book by Headline on the 1st August. Don’t despair if you’re more of a paperback lover, as the paperback is due to be released next year. It really is worth the wait! Many thanks to Anne Cater for the blog tour invite, and thank you to Phoebe Swinburn for the ARC via Netgalley. Here is my review:


A heartbreaking letter. A girl locked away.  A mystery to be solved.

1956. When Ivy Jenkins falls pregnant she is sent in disgrace to St Margaret’s, a dark, brooding
house for unmarried mothers. Her baby is adopted against her will. Ivy will never leave.

Present day. Samantha Harper is a journalist desperate for a break. When she stumbles on a
letter from the past, the contents shock and move her. The letter is from a young mother,
begging to be rescued from St Margaret’s. Before it is too late. 
Sam is pulled into the tragic story and discovers a spate of unexplained deaths surrounding the
woman and her child. With St Margaret’s set for demolition, Sam has only hours to piece
together a sixty-year-old mystery before the truth, which lies disturbingly close to home, is lost for
ever…

Read her letter. Remember her story…

What does TWG think?

I am fully prepared for the fact that my review may not do the book justice at all, but I aim to give it my best shot.

-falls on the floor- If I could get away with a review merely stating, ‘OutFLIPPINGstanding – EVERYONE MUST BUY!’, I totally would. In fact, I couldn’t have summed it up better in four words if I had tried. Luckily (or unluckily, depends which way you look at it), I enjoy talking and I feel that ‘The Girl in the Letter’ deserves to be in the spotlight for as long as possible, sooooo, sorry to my four words, but even I know I’m going to need to do better.

Set in 1956 when mother and baby houses were around for unmarried mothers to cleanse their souls and deal with their ‘sins’, ‘The Girl in the Letter’ tells the emotional story of a young girl called Ivy, who had her path chosen for her against her will. Her life in St Margaret’s was very, very tough. She saw things that people her age and younger should never see, let alone have to deal with. But what could she do? The nuns were set in their ways, and their punishments were very severe – whichever way she looked at it, Ivy was well and truly screwed but, as always, she couldn’t help but hope for the best.

The majority of ‘The Girl in the Letter’ is set in the present day, as we follow the life of a journalist who is struggling to find the right balance between her work life, and her life with her daughter. However, without even realising it, something had been sitting under Samantha’s nose for a very long time. With her work hat on, Sam is determined to get to the bottom of the situation without thinking of the consequences. To be perfectly honest, I couldn’t help but wonder why she should think of the consequences when she didn’t know where the path would lead. How could Sam foresee the future? She couldn’t.

I finished ‘The Girl in the Letter’ in the early hours of this morning whilst trying to put my jaw back in its rightful position. I knew that my review would take some thinking about, yet despite having all day to formulate some sort of review, I am still struggling to get my opinion out in a way that makes perfect sense. I even demanded that my mother buy this book and, seeing as she isn’t much of a reader, i have to ensure that the books I demand her to read are ones that I feel cannot be missed. And this is certainly one of them.

Whilst the contents of ‘The Girl in the Letter’ makes for quite a hard-hitting, severely intense and emotive read, the entire storyline is written absolutely beautifully and does the theme justice. Emily Gunnis does state at the end of the book that the storyline is a work of fiction, with themes inspired by real life mother and child homes in Ireland. I think that because I knew that women actually endured living in those conditions, gave birth in those conditions, as well as being told that their unborn child was a sin, it hit home a lot more because it was real. I am in still in shock that conditions like these existed and, if the laws were to be the same now here in the UK and I were to think about my current situation as a single mum, I would be in the same position as the women mentioned in this book. Isn’t that scary?

I loved how ‘The Girl in the Letter’ had a historical feel to it, as well as a thick layer of something a lot grittier as it made the suspense level far more intense than I could have ever imagined.

Emily Gunnis’ literary skill blew me away and left me dumbfounded by its beauty. What an enchanting, heart-wrenching, beautifully written and intense read this is. This book gave me everything I could have ever wanted in a storyline, and then some. I fell in love with the story almost straight away and, whilst my heart shattered multiple times throughout, I still found myself loving ‘The Girl in the Letter’ and everything it stands for.

If I were to be asked to choose just ONE book that I think everyone should buy and read urgently, ‘The Girl in the Letter’ would fall from my lips (or my fingers) before the question had even been fully asked. I genuinely cannot recommend this enough, and I truly feel that everyone would be missing out on a diamond of a read if they didn’t get their hands on a copy.

By far one of my all time favourite novels, Emily Gunnis has swooped in as a new favourite author, and one who I will now be watching very, very closely for future releases. Incredible….absolutely incredible.

Buy now in e-book from Amazon

About the author.

Emily Gunnis previously worked in TV drama and lives in Brighton with her young family. She is
one of the four daughters of Sunday Times bestselling author Penny Vincenzi.

Follow her on Twitter @EmilyGunnis
Instagram @emilygunnis
and Facebook @emilygunnisauthor.

#BlogBlitz! #Review – No Place Like Home by Rebecca Muddiman (@RebeccaMuddiman) @BloodHoundBook


Today I am joining in with yet another BloodHoundBooks blog blitz, but this time it’s for ‘No Place Like Home’ by Rebecca Muddiman. Big thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blitz invite and the ARC of the book. Here is my review:

What would you do if you came home to find someone in your house?
This is the predicament Polly Cooke faces when she returns to her new home.The first weeks in the house had been idyllic, but soon Jacob, a local man, is watching her.
What does he want and why is he so obsessed with Polly?
In a situation where nothing is what it seems, you might end up regretting letting some people in.

What does TWG think?

Holy cheeseballs, this book!!!!

Gripping – TICK
Addictive – TICK
Complete and utter head funk – TICK, TICK, TICK!

‘No Place Like Home’ is proof that nothing is ever as it seems. It is also proof that readers automatically side with the person who they deem the weakest leak, or the person who they feel is the ‘victim’. Well, it’s proof that I did, anyway. The author tells the story of Polly, a woman who, as far as we are made aware, has had a turbulent life so far. Her trust in people is non-existent, and she is fearing for her life due to an unsavoury character from her past reappearing. Polly has tried to rebuild her life and start anew in a new house which she can now call her own. Who wouldn’t feel sorry for Polly?

Again, nothing is ever as it seems and Rebecca Muddiman cements that fact time and time again in ‘No Place Like Home’.

There were a a couple things in the book which shocked me and made me feel pretty uncomfortable, yet they weirdly tied in with the overall storyline brilliantly – even if my mouth did resemble a desert….

I am very impressed by Muddiman’s cleverly crafted storyline, as well as her ability to dangle pieces of information in front of her readers, only to change her mind and the situation rather suddenly. Anytime I thought that I could understand Polly’s character, it didn’t take long for it to become clear that I actually didn’t understand Polly, and to be honest, I don’t think I ever would be able to. I’m not complaining either, in fact it raised my curiosity tenfold.

‘No Place Like Home’ completely funked over my mind. It really did. From start to finish the author had a hold over me, with the only way out being the end of the book. If you’re after a book which keeps you guessing, takes you on a rollercoaster ride, AND completely stuffs up your way of logical thinking, then this book is definitely for you. Rebecca Muddiman is a new author for me, but after reading this comprehensive, gripping, and uncomfortable addictive storyline, I can guarantee that this won’t be the last book I read of hers either.

Buy now from Amazon

About the author.

Rebecca Muddiman was born and raised in the North East and worked in the NHS for many years. She has published four crime novels – Stolen, Gone, Tell Me Lies, and Murder in Slow Motion. Stolen won a Northern Writers Award in 2010 and the Northern Crime Competition in 2012. She is also a screenwriter and was selected for the London Screenwriters Festival Talent Campus in 2016.
Most of her spare time is spent re-watching Game of Thrones, trying to learn Danish, and dealing with two unruly dogs. Sometimes all at the same time.

Links:
 

#BlogTour! #Review – #TheLightBetweenUs by Katie Khan (@Katie_Khan) @TransworldBooks @hannahlbright29 @AnneCater #RandomThingsTours


I am beyond delighted to be today’s stop on the blog tour for ‘The Light Between Us’ by Katie Khan. Big thank you to Anne Cater and #RandomThingsTours for the blog tour invite, and thank you to Transworld Books for the ARC. Here is my review:

Thea and Isaac first met at University. Theirs was an instant connection but it never went further than friendship.

Because, then and now, Thea only has eyes for her work. Not just her course, but also a private project – Thea is determined to prove that time travel is not just the stuff of science fiction. And she has never told anyone the reason why.

When one of their friends goes missing in an experiment, Isaac and Thea must work together to find her – forcing them to re-examine their own friendship.

Is it really as platonic as they used to think?

The Light Between Us is a story of unrequited love and second chances. It begs the dangerous question that we all ask ourselves – what could have been?

What does TWG think?

Look I’ll be honest – if I was watching TV and a film about time travelling came on, I would instantly switch over. For me personally, the whole science fiction, portal, time travelling sorta stuff has never been my cup of tea. Until now. Yes, yes, I know. I am as surprised as you are. However, my feelings on the theme of the book have changed due to Katie Khan. Whether I would find another fictional novel containing science fiction, as outstanding as this one, I’m not too sure. All I know is, is that Katie Khan has completely and utterly blown me away. What a beautifully written, engaging, mind-blowing and thought-provoking read this is. I have honestly never read anything like it, but if Katie Khan’s future releases are going to be anything like this one, I think I have now found my go-to author for science fiction and the like.

It is incredibly difficult to write this review without giving away spoilers, so I am hoping my vagueness will intrigue you enough to buy yourself a copy.

That said, have you ever believed in something so much, you couldn’t think about anything else except that one thing? Have you ever felt so determined to prove people wrong, you end up doing things out of character? Some might say that that is going overboard. Others might say that being passionate isn’t a bad thing. But, if you end up being close to losing people you love because your mind is heading down one path, and one path only, sometimes the only question you need to ask yourself is, ‘Is this all really worth it?’.

How many of you have sat thinking about your past, wondering what situations would have been like if….oh I don’t know, Santa Claus wore green and Christmas Day was in July? Or what would have happened if you chose not to hold a grudge because your best friend borrowed your pencil and never returned it? Or even, what things would have been like if you were brought up differently, your parents chose different paths for you, and the decisions you made weren’t the ones you actually wanted to make? We all have done something like that, I’m sure. Granted the grudges and Christmas Day ideologies may be slightly different, but I had to throw them in there just in case.

Thea, like us, has sat pondering about her life and wondered ‘what if’. Two short ones, yet they’re full of copious amounts of uncertainty. Unlike us, Thea has science at her fingertips, and boy does she know how to use it. I’m no science buff at all yet I believed I could turn into a physicist after reading this book! Not going to happen, obviously, but Thea made me believe! Whilst I didn’t understand the scientific experiment completely, I still managed to get bowled over by the intelligence within, including the outstanding historical facts that feature later on in the book. People say that you don’t learn anything from fictional books, and I can say that that is a load of tosh as Katie Khan and ‘The Light Between Us’ taught me multiple things!

The only way I can describe my true feelings of this book is if I told you to sit and imagine a dark sky, splattered with millions of twinkly stars, no background noise except the sound of your own breathing, feeling content with every minor detail of your current life. So much so, that quiet night sky has turned into a rainbow of colour as fireworks light up the sky….just because. When I closed the book early hours of this morning, I felt like anything was possible. I felt the frisson of excitement thanks to Thea’s enthusiasm. But, most importantly, my heart was beating like fireworks, with a massive grin plastered on my face. I’m not sure if that makes sense, but that is how I felt.

I wish I could give this more than five stars, I really do. I just hope that when the author looks up at the night sky tonight to see the stars, she realises that the millions of twinkly stars in the sky still is nowhere near the amount of stars this books deserves, yet its close enough.

Katie Khan, you lit up my world for the duration of the book and for that, I thank you. What a powerful, powerful read – I urge you all to get yourself a copy and ignore everyone and everything whilst you read it.

‘The Light Between Us’ will be available to buy on the 9th August, but you can pre-order it now from Amazon