#ThreePerfectLiars @HeidiPerksBooks @arrowpublishing #blogtour #review

Many thanks to Rachel for inviting me to take part in the blog tour for ‘Three Perfect Liars’ by Heidi Perks. Here is my review:

When a body is pulled out of an office fire, three women are first in line for questioning.

All of them have reasons for wanting revenge against the company’s CEO.

It could be Laura, who has returned to work to find that her maternity cover isn’t leaving. The CEO insists he’s doing what’s best for the company. Laura isn’t convinced he’s telling the truth.

Or there’s Mia. Brought in as temporary cover for Laura, she has quickly made herself indispensable – and popular with her colleagues. But if people knew why she was so desperate to keep her job, they might not welcome her so freely.

Then there’s Janie, wife to the CEO, who gave up her courtroom career to support her husband and his business. She has her own secret to protect – and will go to any length to keep it safe.

They never thought it would come to this.

What does TWG think?

Three women, three different version of events, but which one is lying?

This book completely blindsided me! Laura has gone back to work after having her little boy, Bobby, but finds her replacement, Mia, with her feet firmly under Laura’s desk. Whilst everyone is worshipping the ground that Mia walks on, Laura isnt at all convinced by the game shes playing and is adamant that Mia’s true colours will be shown.

I thought that Laura’s obsession with Mia completely took over the storyline. It was as though she was a dog with a bone, refusing to give it up. To a point I could see why as Mia’s character gave off a dishonest vibe, yet on the other hand i couldnt quite see why Laura didnt just let it go, especially since her priorities had changed due to becoming a mum.

‘Three Perfect Liars’ is told from Mia, Laura’s and Janie’s point of views, so not only do we get to follow Laura’s obsession with Mia, we get to know parts of Mia’s personality, as well as trying to find out what it is that has ruffled Janie’s feathers. These women are such a mixed bag in terms of their personalities, and is found their involvement with each other quite surprising.

Even though I felt that Laura’s obsession with Mia overshadowed the rest of the storyline a little, the more of the book I read, the more the storyline made sense and the pieces began to fit very nicely together. There is a intriguing question of ‘whodunnit’ hanging over the storyline, something which kept me on tenterhooks as it could have been anyone. I’m genuinely surprised that I didnt get papercuts on my hands because of the speed in which I turned the pages. Maybe I had found my own temporary obsession with Heidi Perks’ novel?

I loved the ‘edge of my seat’ suspense and the air of mystery which spoke volumes throughout the whole book. I felt that a lot of the characters were quite dislikeable, however I dont think having characters who were as nice as pie would work in the same way.

I thought that the author delivered the intensity brilliantly and, as I said at the start, I was completely blindsided by what materialised. In fact, the amount of shock I was in made the ending of the book feel a bit anticlimactic as I was ready to keep on reading to try and delve into the psychology behind the characters actions. I’m nosy, I admit it!

Psychologically brilliant, topical, and thrilling on many different levels – I highly recommend this belter of a book.

Pre-order now.

It’s good for your children to make friends…#LittleFriends in fact….but is it? @janeshemilt @MichaelJBooks

Many thanks to the Michael Joseph/Penguin team for inviting me to take part in Jane Shemilt’s blog tour for ‘Little Friends’, and for the ARC. Here is my review:

Their children are friends first. They hit it off immediately, as kids do.

So the parents are forced to get to know each other. But as they get closer, they start to take their eyes off their children.

And while they have been looking the other way, evil has crept in.

Every parent’s biggest nightmare is about to come true…

What does TWG think?

Eve is a laid back parent. A parent who doesnt give her children as many boundaries as what her husband, Eric, would like. With a daughter who has dyslexia, Eve gets a little tutor group going for other children on a Sunday. What started off as an innocent tutor group ended up turning into something much more sinister.

‘Little Friends’ is told from the voices of Eve, Melissa, and Grace, the mothers of the children in the story. The great thing about the book being told from different perspectives meant that as readers, we get to hear the story from various angles instead of it being one sided from just one particular character.

I found this book an incredibly unsettling and uncomfortable read, yet I was unable to tear my eyes away from the disaster that was unfolding before my very eyes. I would love to delve further into what I read, however due to spoilers I would be very afraid to do so incase I accidentally tripped up.

Jane Shmelit has crammed a lot of content into her book, covering topics such as marital problems, grief, dyslexia, parenting troubles, mental health, abuse…the lot. Weirdly enough, I didnt feel overwhelmed by how much content there was as everything slotted in well to the premise of the book.

Even though I felt as though my body was encased in a block of ice due to the chilling nature of the storyline, I flew through the novel in no more than three hours. It was so dark, so compelling, so gut wrenching….I felt like I wasnt able to continue yet my brain seemed to have other ideas.

I feel bad for saying that I throughly enjoyed this book due to what the story contained, however I was SO impressed by Jane Shmelit’s way with words and the realistic picture she painted with her characters and the journeys they embarked on.

As unsettling as this may have been, I was absolutely hooked and I have a strong feeling that readers will struggle to keep this novel from their minds. A moving, sinister, memorable domestic thriller – not for the faint hearted!

Buy now.

#TheMemoryWood gives me the creeps!!!! @samlloydwrites @AnneCater @TransworldBooks

Once again, thank you to Anne Cater for the blog tour invite, and to Transworld Books for the ARC. Delighted to welcome debut author, Sam Lloyd, to TWG today with a review of his debut novel, ‘The Memory Wood’.

Elijah has lived in the Memory Wood for as long as he can remember. It’s the only home he’s ever known.

Elissa has only just arrived. And she’ll do everything she can to escape.

When Elijah stumbles across thirteen-year-old Elissa, in the woods where her abductor is hiding her, he refuses to alert the police. Because in his twelve years, Elijah has never had a proper friend. And he doesn’t want Elissa to leave.

Not only that, Elijah knows how this can end. After all, Elissa isn’t the first girl he’s found inside the Memory Wood.

As her abductor’s behaviour grows more erratic, Elissa realises that outwitting strange, lonely Elijah is her only hope of survival. Their cat-and-mouse game of deception and betrayal will determine both their fates, and whether either of them will ever leave the Memory Wood . . .

What does TWG think?

Errrrr, can someone please pass me the bog roll? I seem to have defecated in my Lee Cooper’s! Scared poopless springs to mind!!!! I like a good thrill as much as the next person, but sheesh! This ain’t no ‘Casper the friendly ghost’ type scare!

In my defence, I was pretty poorly whilst reading this, so maybe a little bit more vulnerable than normal. I mean, if anyone had shouted my name I think I would have jumped out of my skin, so to read a book which had a supernatural type vibe to it, alongside a dark and demonesque thriller vibe, it’s safe to say that I wanted Casper nearby!

I was incredibly impressed by the connectivity of the the storyline. The author had created such realistic paths between each character and their individual journeys in the story, whilst also maintaining the flow of the overall book. As a reader, I cant even begin to imagine just how difficult of a task that can be for authors, however Sam Lloyd really delivered.

I know I sounded like a bit of a wimp at the start of this review, but can I just say that the thrill and fear factor was so cleverly woven into the storyline, it soon became a case of ‘I dont want to look but I need to look’ in terms of turning the pages. It worked bloody well.

‘The Memory Wood’ is incredibly unique, incredibly chilling, and also incredibly clever. I am in shock that this is the work of a debut author and I absolutely cannot wait to see what other gems Sam Lloyd has up his sleeve if this is anything to go by!

Buy now

You’ve got #ThreeHours…how would you use them? #ThreeHoursNovel @RosamundLupton @VikingBooksUK #review

I honestly doubt that my review of ‘Three Hours’ will do the book justice at all, but I will try my very best. Hugest of thanks to Viking for the tour invite and ARC.

Three hours is 180 minutes or 10,800 seconds.

It is a morning’s lessons, a dress rehearsal of Macbeth, a snowy trek through the woods.

It is an eternity waiting for news. Or a countdown to something terrible.

It is 180 minutes to discover who you will die for and what men will kill for.

In rural Somerset in the middle of a blizzard, the unthinkable happens: a school is under siege. Told from the point of view of the people at the heart of it, from the wounded headmaster in the library, unable to help his trapped pupils and staff, to teenage Hannah in love for the first time, to the parents gathering desperate for news, to the 16 year old Syrian refugee trying to rescue his little brother, to the police psychologist who must identify the gunmen, to the students taking refuge in the school theatre, all experience the most intense hours of their lives, where evil and terror are met by courage, love and redemption.

What does TWG think?

For someone who talks a lot, I’m struggling to find the words to express just how much ‘Three Hours’ blew my mind.

It isnt often that I have to stop reading a book for a few minutes every now and then, just so I could digest every emotion, every situation, and every single detail about the storyline. But that was the case with this book, and what a book it was.

‘Three Hours’ tells the story of a school community who are forced in a situation no-one should ever be in. Lives are at stake. Friendships are at stake. And all because of what? Racism? Bigots? Refugees? Psychopaths?

This story raised my blood pressure and stressed me out, yet given the nature of the book and what it was centred around, I would have been shocked if that hadn’t been the case.

Despite being a fictional story, Rosamund Lupton has referred to real life situations in her book which added to the authenticity and suspense, cementing the reality that people do indeed go through similar situations in their lives. They shouldn’t, and it made me feel quite emotional to see just how evil other people can be. Regardless of religion, skin colour, place of birth etc, they’re still humans and nobody should ever be made to feel anything but.

‘Three Hours’ is such a chilling, yet hauntingly beautiful read, and is one I will not be forgetting in a hurry. I feel bad saying that I loved the book as terror and gunmen dominated the essence of the book, however it was due to the topic and the way that Rosamund Lupton delivered it, which completely blew me away.

I cannot even begin to imagine the terror that refugees feel, nor can I imagine the fear that people must feel if they find themselves in amongst a siege. Even the thought of it sends shivers up and down my spine.

This is an absolutely breathtaking, chilling, raw and poignant novel that makes you sit up and take notice. Three hours may seem like a short amount of time, yet when you’re faced with a life or death situation, three hours can be a lifetime.

I am incredibly honoured that I got the chance to read a book that has ‘film rights’ written all over it, especially one as outstanding as ‘Three Hours’. This is, without a doubt, one of my all time favourite reads, and is one that I will be shouting about for a very long time to come.

Buy now

Nevermind who did I tell, #WhoDidYouTell?! @LesleyKara @TransworldBooks @AnneCater

Apologies for the delay in this post, suffering with migraines due to chronic illnesses. Huge thanks to both Alison Barrow and Anne Cater for your patience regarding the post, and of course for the tour invite itself. It’s a pleasure to be reviewing ‘Who Did You Tell?’ by Lesley Kara.

It’s been 192 days, seven hours and fifteen minutes since her last drink. Now Astrid is trying to turn her life around.

Having reluctantly moved back in with her mother, in a quiet seaside town away from the temptations and painful memories of her life before, Astrid is focusing on her recovery. She’s going to meetings. Confessing her misdeeds. Making amends to those she’s wronged.

But someone knows exactly what Astrid is running from. And they won’t stop until she learns that some mistakes can’t be corrected.

Some mistakes, you have to pay for . . .

What does TWG think?

Having grown up around an alcoholic and seen how alcohol can not only affect the person consuming it, but also those around them, the concept of Lesley Kara’s new book was one I had seen first hand. Despite that, following Astrid’s journey was unique in it’s own right, and the spotlight into the detrimental effects of alcoholism was one that needed to be shone. I thought that the author handled the subject sensitively, yet also maintained the authenticity of the topic with the development of Astrid’s personality and the way in which the overall storyline was crafted.

Whilst ‘Who did you tell?’ can be considered quite a slow burner, the attention to detail and powerful suspense made the slow pace seem quite irrelevant. They say that good things come to those who wait, and I believe that that phrase is very apt where this book is concerned. Astrid isn’t the type of character who you could surmise in a few words, nor is she one who you could ‘work out’ pretty much straight away. I found her complexity very intriguing, and the fact that her exterior peeled away to reveal her inner relatability, was quite endearing.

I thought that the execution of the novel was very well thought out, especially as the storyline still held onto the depth from Astrid’s life until the very end. Even though there were elements of this book which brought back memories and reignited hidden emotions, I still throughly enjoyed the craftsmanship of the novel in its entirety. A bloody powerful and thought provoking read.

Buy now.

#HoldYourTongue otherwise someone might hold it for you! @Deborah_Masson @TransworldBooks

Thank you SO much to Transworld Books for answering my pleas by inviting me on this blog tour, and for the ARC! I apologise for the lateness, but here is my review:

A brutal murder.

A young woman’s body is discovered with horrifying injuries, a recent newspaper cutting pinned to her clothing.

A detective with everything to prove.

This is her only chance to redeem herself.

A serial killer with nothing to lose.

He’s waited years, and his reign of terror has only just begun . . .

Introducing DI Eve Hunter, HOLD YOUR TONGUE is your new obsession.

What does TWG think?

Whenever I saw this book mentioned on social media, I became extremely jealous as I wanted to read it SO badly! Thankfully my pleas were answered and I was able to read a copy for the tour. Was it worth the wait?

OMG YES!!!!!!!!

The opening to ‘Hold Your Tongue’ is brutal, graphic, and weirdly made my eyes want to read more. I had a feeling that it was going to be a little TOO graphic for my liking, however it was a chance that I was willing to take.

DI Eve Hunter seems to have more people gunning for her than she does fighting her battles. I was very curious, wondering what on earth she could have done to get so many peoples backs up.

As the story progresses, the truth about Eve comes to light in dribs and drabs. She feels guilty. She feels incompetent. She feels as though she cannot forgive herself. Now, without giving anything away, I thought she was being too hard on herself yet I could understand why she felt like that. What I didn’t realise at the time, however, was that there was more to that particular story than I thought. Tons more.

If you’re squeamish then maybe this isnt the book for you, although the graphic parts are tastefully done and in keeping with the rest of the book. Pardon the pun….or not.

Now the thing about being rendered useless in this cold weather due to my illnesses, is that I can binge read and nobody can say anything. So I did….until I had reached the end of the book! I wasnt putting it down for anybody! Not even to pee!!!!

‘Hold Your Tongue’ completely exceeded my expectations. From start to finish the author reeled her readers in, like a spider taking her prey into a web. I was hooked by the ‘whys?’ of the story, especially when it came to the truth behind the culprits actions. I thought that Eve was such a complex character with more sides to her than a human actually needs, yet I found her weirdly relatable. Her personality worked with the other characters, and I dont think, as weird as this sounds, that the overall story would have worked if someone else was at the heart of the book instead of Eve.

What I loved most about Deborah Masson’s book was how she mixed fraught emotions alongside graphic and dark suspense. I thought the combination was sensational.

I really hope this is the first book of many that include DI Eve Hunter, as I truly believe she has more to tell us. The same as Cooper, Mearns and Ferguson.

‘Hold Your Tongue’ really is a spine tingling, dark, devious, intense read which really made me feel as though the cat had got my tongue! This is such an edge of your seat thriller, a truly sensational, jam packed read, written by an author who is definitely one to watch. I cannot WAIT to find out what Masson does next!

Available to purchase in e-Book format.

Did you get #TheChristmasInvitation? Trisha Ashley did! @trishaashley @annecater @TransworldBooks #blogtour #review

Many thanks to Anne for the blog tour invite, and thank you to Hayley for the ARC – I am excited to be reviewing Trisha Ashley’s new book today!

Meg is definitely not in the Christmas mood. She’s never gone in for tinsel, baubles and mistletoe, and right now she’s still getting over an illness. Yet when she’s invited to spend the run-up to Christmas in the snowy countryside, rather than dreary London, she can’t refuse.

Arriving at a warm and cosy family home in a small hilltop village, Meg soon begins to wonder what a proper Christmas might be like. But just as she’s beginning to settle in, she spots a familiar face. Lex.

Despite the festive cheer, Meg suddenly wants nothing more than to get as far away from him, and their past secrets, as she can. But if she stays, could this be the year she finally discovers the magic of Christmas…?

What does TWG think?

What I love most about Trisha Ashley, is the way she creates such unique characters who always seem to make their way into readers hearts. Meg was certainly one of those characters. She wasn’t perfect. She was a little rough around the edges. Some might say that Meg was ‘perfectly flawed’, and I would agree with that one hundred percent as she took those flaws and embraced them instead of trying to be something she wasn’t.

I really enjoyed the warmth of ‘The Christmas Invitation’ and the message it relayed to readers regarding the importance of community spirit, the importance of embracing situations one may find uncomfortable, as well as the importance of being true to who you are and what you believe in.

I will hold my hands up and say that i felt that the book was incredibly slow to get going, often going off on a tangent at times it didn’t feel overly necessary to the story. In all honesty, I did struggle with those parts because I just wanted to get back to the main part of the book, instead being sidelined by things that didn’t really fit in.

That said, I really warmed to Cara, and i found her hilarious personality an absolute joy to get to know. I loved how she made the story come alive with her ‘no bull’ attitude and genuine love for those she held dear.

Despite my earlier irks, I really enjoyed the festivities of the overall storyline, especially as I ended up finishing it with a massive smile on my face. Romance may be the spice of life for some, yet Trisha Ashley makes warmth, family, Christmas, and the sense of belonging, the spices of life in general and, to be perfectly honest, what more could you ask for?

A genuine, humble and heartwarming novel, ideal for those warm cosy nights of winter.

Buy now.

#BlogTour! #Review – #TheManWhoSawEverything by Deborah Levy @VikingBooksUK @bookswithbolino

(Many thanks to Viking Books for the ARC and blog tour invite.)

In 1988 Saul Adler (a narcissistic, young historian) is hit by a car on the Abbey Road. He is apparently fine; he gets up and goes to see his art student girlfriend, Jennifer Moreau. They have sex then break up, but not before she has photographed Saul crossing the same Abbey Road.

Saul leaves to study in communist East Berlin, two months before the Wall comes down. There he will encounter – significantly – both his assigned translator and his translator’s sister, who swears she has seen a jaguar prowling the city. He will fall in love and brood upon his difficult, authoritarian father. And he will befriend a hippy, Rainer, who may or may not be a Stasi agent, but will certainly return to haunt him in middle age.

What does TWG think?

Having not read any of Deborah Levy’s previous novels, I wasn’t at all sure what to expect. I was aware that this particular author had had several of her books nominated for the ‘Man Booker Prize’, so I had already guessed what particular league the story would be in.

‘The Man Who Saw Everything’ is like nothing I have ever read before and, whilst i attempted to remain openminded about the unique story, the uncertainty and unpredictability was slightly unnerving at times. It didn’t have the same sort of storyline stepping stones as a crime novel or a contemporary fiction, where you know where the story was heading based on where you were in the book. It seemed to have it’s own rules.

With one half of the book set in 1988 and the other half set in the ‘present’, ‘The Man Who Saw Everything’ tells the story of Saul, a historian who seems to spend most of his time battling with himself or embarking on some sort of romantic past time, if you catch my drift.

I don’t think that Saul didn’t care about who he hurt, I think that perhaps he cared a little too much at times….probably about the wrong things though, I must add.

I thought it was clever how the author used dissociation as the main ‘thing’ in her book, especially as Saul’s mind refused to let him see life in all its mismatch glory, instead he saw it as something only he could understand.

I appreciated the authors intricate attention to detail and the way she crafted such a uniquely blended storyline – I was quite moved by Saul’s reaction when he realised that reality was going to sink in and he had no other choice but to oblige.

Personally, I don’t think that ‘The Man Who Saw Everything’ was really my thing overall, however I thoroughly enjoyed stepping out of my comfort zone and reading a book which puts your mind to work, thinking about just how easily we take things for granted.

Buy now.

#BlogTour! #Review – Stop At Nothing by Tammy Cohen (@MsTamarCohen) @TransworldBooks @AnneCater

tammyc
TWG is delighted to be hosting day three of the ‘Stop At Nothing’ by Tammy Cohen, blog tour. Huge thanks to Anne Cater and TransworldBooks for the blog tour invite and ARC. Here is my review:

Stop At Nothing cover

A mother’s job is to keep her children safe.

Tess has always tried to be a good mother. Of course, there are things she wishes she’d done differently, but doesn’t everyone feel that way?

Then Emma, her youngest, is attacked on her way home from a party, plunging them into a living nightmare which only gets worse when the man responsible is set free. But what if she fails?

So when Tess sees the attacker in the street near their home, she is forced to take matters into her own hands. But blinded by her need to protect her daughter at any cost, might she end up putting her family in even greater danger?

There’s nothing she wouldn’t do to make it right . . .

What does TWG think?

Ooooooooooo, this one is juicy!!!

Tess gets the fright of a lifetime when she finds out that her sixteen year old daughter, Emma, was attacked. She can’t help feeling guilty and laying the blame on herself, and many others are quick to point the finger at Tess for not picking up her daughter, instead letting her find her own way back after a party. But Tess didn’t attack her own daughter, so why is SHE in the firing line for it?

I reallyyyyyy didn’t like Tess at first. I actually found her quite annoying and, as harsh as this may sound; incredibly selfish. As a parent its only natural that we feel guilty whenever our children are hurt, wondering what we could have done to stop it from happening, however Tess seemed to take that to a whole new level. It was Emma who was attacked, not her. I couldn’t quite understand why Tess was making it all about her, when her main focus should have been on her daughter.

I was quite surprised to find that my opinion of Tess did change throughout the course of the book and, even though I didn’t end up absolutely adoring her character, I was able to understand her personality a little bit better. Tess’ heart was in the right place and her actions were laced with love for her daughters, she just went about it all in completely the wrong way. That said, who I am to judge on how someone else deals with particular situations.

I much preferred the second half of Tammy Cohen’s book as I felt that the intensity behind the repercussion of the attack had amplified. There seemed to be a lot more grit to sink my teeth in at that stage, especially as I was trying to work out why a certain character (naming no names due to potential spoilers) popped up here, there and everywhere at such ‘convenient’ times.

I really did enjoy reading ‘Stop At Nothing’, the psychological elements of the storyline made for such twisted and toe curling reading – I loved them. Top marks to Cohen for the way she crafted those parts! My head couldn’t keep up! Bloomin’ brilliant!

The whole Emma, nameless character, and Tess situation certainly opened my eyes to how differently we deal with things, and how much our paranoia intensifies when faced with a potentially dangerous situation. Do I think that Tess went overboard? A little bit. Would I have done the same thing? I honestly cannot say what I would have done in the same situation, all I know is that I wouldn’t have been sat around doing nothing.

‘Stop At Nothing’ is a captivating, addictive novel which had me speeding through the pages faster than Lewis Hamilton in a race! Such a clever and thought-provoking novel, Tammy Cohen has done her characters justice.

‘Stop At Nothing’ by Tammy Cohen, will be published on the 18th July by TransworldBooks Books. You can pre-order your copy here.

#BlogTour! #Review – The Sleepwalker by Joseph Knox (@josephknox_) @TransworldBooks @AnneCater

Day two of ‘The Sleepwalker’ blog tour is here, and I am UBER excited to share my review today. Many thanks to Anne Cater for the blog tour invite, and thank you to Transworld Books for the ARC.

‘He said he didn’t remember killing them…’

As a series of rolling blackouts plunge the city into darkness, Detective Aidan Waits sits on an abandoned hospital ward, watching a mass murderer slowly die. Transferred from his usual night shift duties and onto protective custody, he has just one job…

To extract the location of Martin Wick’s final victim before the notorious mass murderer passes away.

Wick has spent over a decade in prison, in near-total silence, having confessed to an unspeakable crime that shocked the nation and earned him the nickname of TheSleepwalker.

But when a daring premeditated attack leaves one police officer dead and another one fighting for his life, Wick’s whispered last words will send Waits on a journey into the heart of darkness…

Manipulated by a reticent psychopath from his past, and under investigation from his new partner, Detective Constable Naomi Black, Waits realises too late that a remorseless contract killer is at work.

Can Aidan Waits solve his last case before fleeing justice? Or will his name be next on the hit list?

What does TWG think?

Ahhhhhhh why did I not know about these books until now! Yes, that’s right, I’m holding my hands up and saying that I popped my Joseph Knox cherry with ‘The Sleepwalker’. However, I didn’t quite realise how important it would be to read the previous books beforehand. I mean, some people might be okay reading this as a standalone, but I struggled not knowing much about Aidan Waits and his journey up until now.

The fact that I didn’t know to read the previous books isn’t anyones fault, I just wanted to mention it in case anyone else was popping their Joseph Knox cherry.

Ignoring the above, holy cheeseballs Joseph Knox knows how to write!!!!! What a sublimely intense, chilling and fast paced read that left me breathless more often than not.

I loved the fact that the storyline was jam packed with adventure that meant my head was spinning with the knowledge of Wicks, a murderer dubbed as ‘The Sleepwalker’, and trying to work out whether anyone wanted Aidan dead, and why? Was he a threat? Did he know to much? Was someone jealous?

‘The Sleepwalker’ is a fantastically written, thrill inducing novel. I finished the book watching my own back, never mind Aidan’s! The concept of the story was very, very clever – I had no idea something like that was possible! I am looking forward to binge reading the other books in the series now!

‘The Sleepwalker’ will be published by Transworld on the 11th July but can be pre-ordered now from Amazon