#BlogTour! #Review – #AHomeFromHome by Veronica Henry (@veronica_henry @Orionbooks @AnneCater

Next up on TWG is a delightful book from one of my all time favourite authors, Veronica Henry. Many thanks to Orion and Anne Cater for the blog tour invite and ARC. I hope you enjoy my review of ‘A Home From Home’!

Sunshine, cider and family secrets…

Dragonfly Farm has been a home and a haven for generations of Melchiors – arch rivals to the Culbones, the wealthy family who live on the other side of the river. Life there is dictated by the seasons and cider-making, and everyone falls under its spell.

For cousins Tabitha and Georgia, it has always been a home from home. When a tragedy befalls their beloved Great-Uncle Matthew, it seems the place where they’ve always belonged might now belong to them…

But the will reveals that a third of the farm has also been left to a Culbone. Gabriel has no idea why he’s been included, or what his connection to the farm – or the Melchiors – can be.

As the first apples start to fall for the cider harvest, will Dragonfly Farm begin to give up its secrets?

What does TWG think?

There is a reason why Veronica Henry is one of my all time favourite authors, and ‘A Home From Home’ is that very reason! Honestly, this is a home away from home read that delivered hope and beauty behind every word.

For as long as she can remember, Dragonfly Farm had been Tabitha’s home; a place where she felt safe. However one day, her life became a mismatched mess when a loved one passed away suddenly. Not only did Tabitha have grief to contend with, she also had the fear of whether she would end up losing her home.

Theres a lot of history behind Dragonfly Farm, and whilst some of it may be hearsay and what not, a lot of it has been kept a secret from those who were involved the most. Now we all know what secrets do to people, including families! I would have been surprised if the storyline didn’t contain fireworks!

Alongside Tabitha is her cousin, Georgia – literally chalk and cheese. One is fiery and very hot headed, yet the other is more logical. It was interesting to watch their two lives combine as they came together bound by their family ties and grief.

There are a lot of characters to keep an eye on in this storyline, especially as the book is dual timeline and visits the past with more characters. I did struggle to keep up with who was related to who, who dabbled with who, who was still alive and what not, but I think I got the gist of it! By the way, can I just say what AWESOME character names are in this book!!!!

I thought ‘A Home From Home’ was such a magical novel. I really didn’t want it to end and felt as though I had lost my right arm when it did! Veronica Henry, in my opinion, is the queen of comfort reads, and she certainly went above and beyond with her storyline this time round. I was spellbound by the family histories of the Melchiors and Culbones, and i fell in love with the cosy Dragonfly Farm that seemed to hold the key to eternal happiness.

Reading ‘A Home From Home’ is the perfect book to escape into and forget reality. I mean, who needs politics when you have characters like Plum and Gabriel? A truly wonderful, humble, and touching novel that lit up my light for the duration of the story. I adored it.

‘A Home From Home’ will be published on the 25th July. Pre-order now from Amazon.

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#BlogTour! #Extract from #CallMeALiar by @ColetteMcbeth @HeadlinePG @AnneCater

‘Call Me A Liar’ is on my TBR and I hope I can get round to it soon, however I am delighted to be hosting an extract of the book for my stop on the blog tour today. Thank you to Anne Cater for the blog tour invite. Before we get to the extract, here is a bit more about ‘Call Me A Liar’:

You could say it started with vanity. We believed we were special. But the truth is we were simply vulnerable.

Months after landing their dream job, five brilliant young minds are sent on a remote retreat.

But when one of them disappears, they’re forced to question why they were brought there in the first place.

And for the first time in their lives, they realise too much knowledge can be deadly . . .

One of them is lying.
One of them is guilty.
No one is safe.

Buy now.

Extract.

Joe

Lewes Police Station

October 2017

Let me say this: cracking Libby’s skull was not part of the plan. I can’t even remember hitting her; it was more of a violent push in the deep heat of an argument and before I could do anything to change the outcome, she was flying backwards, her head making a strange metallic sound as it connected with the stone floor. Ting! That’s the only way I can describe it, like one of those instrumental triangles we used to play in school. It was a shame about the floor too – if it had been a shag pile carpet rather than porcelain, Libby might not be unconscious in hospital. But I’m certain safety was not uppermost in their minds when they were designing that house. It was all sharp angles and hard surfaces and glinting, gleaming glass that allowed your own reflection to stalk you.

I don’t mention any of these misgivings to the police, though. My solicitor has advised me it’s not a good line of defence. They’re hardly going to charge a floor covering with a violent crime, he says.

It’s me they have in their sights, at any rate. Every question is angled towards my guilt. What I did. What I failed to do. My shortcomings – of which there are many – have been itemised and catalogued, and while individually they appear harmless enough, their combined effect in the harsh light of the interview room creates an unsettling picture. I don’t doubt this is the ploy, the web the officers are spinning around me. But it is an effective one nevertheless. Having listened to their accusations and character assassinations for the best part of eight hours, I’m beginning to scare myself.

The main issue appears to be my scant adherence to the rules. Yes, it’s true, there are rules of engagement when you find your self in such situations. Say your wife or child goes missing, say you stumble across a body, or in my case, you happen to knock out a loved one, there are set procedures and scripts to follow. Firstly, you raise the alarm. You call 999. You attempt to help the victim. You account for every second spent before help arrives. Officer, I passed wind at 2.02 p.m. You display the correct mixture of horror, fear and sadness. You cry the requisite amount of tears. Basically, you’re aiming for high levels of authenticity in every single action. Anything too forced or overly dramatic will arouse suspicion. Anything too casual and you are cold and callous. It’s a balancing act and I’m no circus entertainer. I’m failing spectacularly.

I did nothing. Try explaining that one away. I tell them I panicked but even that’s not true. I wasted precious minutes standing over Libby unable to compute what had happened. There was nothing left inside me, no nerves or sensory receptors to send messages to my brain. Even when finally I leant over her to assess the level of damage, I became instead mesmerised by my own face, gawping at me from the polished brilliance of the porcelain floor.

Well, look what you’ve done.

You thought you were special.

Turns out you’re every bit as bad as the rest.

The officers say they want to know everything, but this is a lie. They want to know everything around the narrow field of their investigation, scavenging for morsels of extraneous information that will get us nowhere while blocking out the bigger picture. I have no intention of pandering to them. I could tell them Amy Winehouse was playing on the karaoke system at the party downstairs, not Amy herself, obviously, but Will’s brutal destruction of ‘I’m No Good’, but that would be pointless scene­setting, nothing more. I could make a stab at describing the hurt Libby inflicted upon me. Her revelation chiselling into my bones. I don’t love you, I never did. How she stood in front of me and delivered this nugget of truth. I could tell them how it burnt through the epidermis right down to the subcutis, how I thought the pain might send me mad with grief, but this would provide them with a motive, allow them to craft a neat narrative around revenge.

And this is not a story about revenge.

It’s about ambition and greed, and love, I suppose, and what we do in the name of them.

I tell the officers I looked out of the window and saw the car and the two men getting into it and driving off. I tell them I ran into the hallway and that’s when I saw the smoke and felt the blistering heat.

Have I mentioned the fire?

It has been suggested several times that I started it deliberately to cover up my crime, as if an assault wasn’t enough for one evening and I decided to go the whole hog and burn the place down.

Let me say this clearly: I did not start the fire but someone else did.

Everyone invited to the party was meant to die in that fire.

And just because we survived doesn’t mean we’re safe.

Not even Libby, if she ever wakes up.

#BlogTour! #Review – Stop At Nothing by Tammy Cohen (@MsTamarCohen) @TransworldBooks @AnneCater

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TWG is delighted to be hosting day three of the ‘Stop At Nothing’ by Tammy Cohen, blog tour. Huge thanks to Anne Cater and TransworldBooks for the blog tour invite and ARC. Here is my review:

Stop At Nothing cover

A mother’s job is to keep her children safe.

Tess has always tried to be a good mother. Of course, there are things she wishes she’d done differently, but doesn’t everyone feel that way?

Then Emma, her youngest, is attacked on her way home from a party, plunging them into a living nightmare which only gets worse when the man responsible is set free. But what if she fails?

So when Tess sees the attacker in the street near their home, she is forced to take matters into her own hands. But blinded by her need to protect her daughter at any cost, might she end up putting her family in even greater danger?

There’s nothing she wouldn’t do to make it right . . .

What does TWG think?

Ooooooooooo, this one is juicy!!!

Tess gets the fright of a lifetime when she finds out that her sixteen year old daughter, Emma, was attacked. She can’t help feeling guilty and laying the blame on herself, and many others are quick to point the finger at Tess for not picking up her daughter, instead letting her find her own way back after a party. But Tess didn’t attack her own daughter, so why is SHE in the firing line for it?

I reallyyyyyy didn’t like Tess at first. I actually found her quite annoying and, as harsh as this may sound; incredibly selfish. As a parent its only natural that we feel guilty whenever our children are hurt, wondering what we could have done to stop it from happening, however Tess seemed to take that to a whole new level. It was Emma who was attacked, not her. I couldn’t quite understand why Tess was making it all about her, when her main focus should have been on her daughter.

I was quite surprised to find that my opinion of Tess did change throughout the course of the book and, even though I didn’t end up absolutely adoring her character, I was able to understand her personality a little bit better. Tess’ heart was in the right place and her actions were laced with love for her daughters, she just went about it all in completely the wrong way. That said, who I am to judge on how someone else deals with particular situations.

I much preferred the second half of Tammy Cohen’s book as I felt that the intensity behind the repercussion of the attack had amplified. There seemed to be a lot more grit to sink my teeth in at that stage, especially as I was trying to work out why a certain character (naming no names due to potential spoilers) popped up here, there and everywhere at such ‘convenient’ times.

I really did enjoy reading ‘Stop At Nothing’, the psychological elements of the storyline made for such twisted and toe curling reading – I loved them. Top marks to Cohen for the way she crafted those parts! My head couldn’t keep up! Bloomin’ brilliant!

The whole Emma, nameless character, and Tess situation certainly opened my eyes to how differently we deal with things, and how much our paranoia intensifies when faced with a potentially dangerous situation. Do I think that Tess went overboard? A little bit. Would I have done the same thing? I honestly cannot say what I would have done in the same situation, all I know is that I wouldn’t have been sat around doing nothing.

‘Stop At Nothing’ is a captivating, addictive novel which had me speeding through the pages faster than Lewis Hamilton in a race! Such a clever and thought-provoking novel, Tammy Cohen has done her characters justice.

‘Stop At Nothing’ by Tammy Cohen, will be published on the 18th July by TransworldBooks Books. You can pre-order your copy here.

#BlogTour! #Review – My Lemon Grove Summer by Jo Thomas (@jo_thomas01) @HeadlinePG @AnneCater

Hugest of thanks to Anne Cater and Headline for the blog tour invite and ARC, I am delighted to be reviewing ‘My Lemon Grove Summer’ by Jo Thomas on my blog today.

When life hands you lemons … is it ever too late for a second chance?

Zelda’s impulsive nature has got her precisely nowhere up until now. A fresh start in a beautiful hilltop town in Sicily looking for new residents, together with her best friend Lennie, could be just what she needs. And who better to settle down with than the person who knows her best?

But the sun-filled skies and sparkling seas can’t hide the shadow hanging over Citta d’Ora, which means not everyone is pleased to see their arrival. The dreams Zelda and her fellow new residents had of setting up a new life might be slipping away. But a friendship with restauranteur Luca could be about to unlock the possibilities that lie in the local lemon groves. And there’s a wedding on the horizon that might be just what the town needs to turn it around…

Could a summer in Sicily help Zelda learn to trust her instinct and follow her heart?

What does TWG think?

Yet again, Jo Thomas delivers a home away from home read with characters you just cannot get enough of. In other words, this author does NOT disappoint.

Zelda thinks she has it all mapped out. Shes made a plan with her best friend and is adamant that she knows what she wants from life, but we all know what happens to best laid plans!!

The setting of ‘My Lemon Grove Summer’ was simply stunning. I have never been to Sicily and, to be honest, the chances of me going anytime soon are incredibly slim! I’m just glad that Jo Thomas pays attention to the finer details in her stories! There were times I felt like I good taste the air, the descriptions were that vivid and that colourful.

Zelda, in my opinion, has a marmite personality and my opinion of her kept changing throughout the book. Theres one thing being confident about your life, but then theres another thing about being over confident, illogical and verging on arrogant. I had everything crossed that Zelda would realise the error of her ways, but I knew deep down that it wouldn’t be an overnight miracle.

It was very easy to get invested in the characters and the goings on in Citta d’Ora. I loved the escapism and having the opportunity to put real life on the back burner for the duration of this book. A wonderful, home away from home read that will bring your heart, as well as your tastebuds, back to life.

Buy now.

#BlogTour! #Review – The Sleepwalker by Joseph Knox (@josephknox_) @TransworldBooks @AnneCater

Day two of ‘The Sleepwalker’ blog tour is here, and I am UBER excited to share my review today. Many thanks to Anne Cater for the blog tour invite, and thank you to Transworld Books for the ARC.

‘He said he didn’t remember killing them…’

As a series of rolling blackouts plunge the city into darkness, Detective Aidan Waits sits on an abandoned hospital ward, watching a mass murderer slowly die. Transferred from his usual night shift duties and onto protective custody, he has just one job…

To extract the location of Martin Wick’s final victim before the notorious mass murderer passes away.

Wick has spent over a decade in prison, in near-total silence, having confessed to an unspeakable crime that shocked the nation and earned him the nickname of TheSleepwalker.

But when a daring premeditated attack leaves one police officer dead and another one fighting for his life, Wick’s whispered last words will send Waits on a journey into the heart of darkness…

Manipulated by a reticent psychopath from his past, and under investigation from his new partner, Detective Constable Naomi Black, Waits realises too late that a remorseless contract killer is at work.

Can Aidan Waits solve his last case before fleeing justice? Or will his name be next on the hit list?

What does TWG think?

Ahhhhhhh why did I not know about these books until now! Yes, that’s right, I’m holding my hands up and saying that I popped my Joseph Knox cherry with ‘The Sleepwalker’. However, I didn’t quite realise how important it would be to read the previous books beforehand. I mean, some people might be okay reading this as a standalone, but I struggled not knowing much about Aidan Waits and his journey up until now.

The fact that I didn’t know to read the previous books isn’t anyones fault, I just wanted to mention it in case anyone else was popping their Joseph Knox cherry.

Ignoring the above, holy cheeseballs Joseph Knox knows how to write!!!!! What a sublimely intense, chilling and fast paced read that left me breathless more often than not.

I loved the fact that the storyline was jam packed with adventure that meant my head was spinning with the knowledge of Wicks, a murderer dubbed as ‘The Sleepwalker’, and trying to work out whether anyone wanted Aidan dead, and why? Was he a threat? Did he know to much? Was someone jealous?

‘The Sleepwalker’ is a fantastically written, thrill inducing novel. I finished the book watching my own back, never mind Aidan’s! The concept of the story was very, very clever – I had no idea something like that was possible! I am looking forward to binge reading the other books in the series now!

‘The Sleepwalker’ will be published by Transworld on the 11th July but can be pre-ordered now from Amazon

#BlogTour! #Review – The Closer I Get by Paul Burston (@PaulBurston) @OrendaBooks @AnneCater

Many thanks to Anne Cater and Orenda for the blog tour invite and ARC, here is my review of ‘The Closer I Get’ by Paul Burston, for my stop on the tour today:

Tom is a successful author, but he’s struggling to finish his novel. His main distraction is an online admirer, Evie, who simply won’t leave him alone.

Evie is smart, well read and unstable; she lives with her father and her social-media friendships are not only her escape, but everything she has.

When she’s hit with a restraining order, her world is turned upside down, and Tom is free to live his life again, to concentrate on writing.

But things aren’t really adding up. For Tom is distracted but also addicted to his online relationships, and when they take a darker, more menacing turn, he feels powerless to change things. Because maybe he needs Evie more than he’s letting on.

What does TWG think?

Several days ago, The Guardian newspaper published an article written by Paul Burston’s inspiration for his new novel, ‘The Closer I Get’. The article explained just how many similarities the author himself has with the characters of the book. Now, I had already read the book when the article was published, and I have to say that my heart went out to Paul Burston for what he went through. Having already appreciated the storyline for the eye opening work that it was, the story grew in depth with the newfound knowledge under my belt.

For me personally, even though Evie was the antagonist of the storyline, I found her character to be one that was highly addictive and extremely compelling. I’ll even go as far to say that she got under my skin. I know that she was in the wrong and that she was psychotic with a capital P, but her character managed to to twist me round to her way of thinking without me even noticing the change. I didn’t want to side with such a manic and obsessive personality, however Paul Burston had me hanging on her every word.

Poor Tom is the victim in the book. That said, he wasn’t exactly likeable! I’m not saying he deserved being stalked and what not, not at all. I just couldn’t help but think that he was a bit of a cactus at times.

The premise of ‘The Closer I Get’ is very apt with today’s society, and the fact that nearly everyone uses social media for one thing or another. It’s not until you’re faced with storylines such as these, that the dark side of social media is revealed and honestly, it’s a bit scary in the wrong hands!

I thought that Paul Burston’s writing was magnetic and deeply moving. His storytelling enriched me deep within and I couldn’t help but be hooked on the obsessive, intense and extremely chilling read which showcases how even the most simple things can be misconstrued.

An absolutely brilliant book with flawed personalities and a socially apt storyline. Probably one of the best books I’ve read this year.

Buy now.

#BlogTour! #Review – The Last Stage by Louise Voss (@louisevoss1) @OrendaBooks @AnneCater

My gosh its busy on TWG today! Blog tour three of the day is for ‘The Last Stage’ by Louise Voss. Many thanks to Anne Cater and Orenda for the blog tour invite. Here is my review:

At the peak of her career as lead singer of a legendary 1980s indie band, Meredith Vincent was driven off the international stage by a horrific incident. Now living a quiet existence in a cottage on the grounds of an old stately home, she has put her past behind her and come to terms with her new life.

When a body is found in the manicured gardens of her home, and a series of inexplicable and unsettling events begins to occur, it becomes clear that someone is watching, someone who knows who she is … Someone who wants vengeance.

And this is only the beginning…

What does TWG think?

Gosh – where to begin!!

This book is uniqueness at its finest; a compelling, seductively suspenseful read which had me bending over backwards to finish.

Louise Voss has incorporated a lot of things into one storyline, and instead of the entire book coming across as overwhelming or too much too soon, the author made it work by allowing her characters to put a spell on me.

The idea of stepping back in time with Meredith and what happened THAT night, was very cleverly done and moved the story seamlessly into the present day where we find out what the aftermath of that horrific night ended up being.

I had absolutely no idea who or what was behind everything, but the thrill of finding out kept me on the edge of my seat. ‘The Last Stage’ may be a dark and psychologically twisted read, however it certainly deserves a place on it’s very own stage to have it’s time in the spotlight. Brilliant storytelling of a outstnading and compulsive read – whats not to like!!

Buy now from Amazon UK

#BlogTour! #Review – The To-Do List by Amy Jones (@jimsyjampots) @EburyPublishing @AnneCater

Many thanks to Anne Cater and Ebury for inviting me to take part in the blog tour for ‘The To-Do List’ by Amy Jones. Also, thank you to the publisher for my ARC – I am delighted to share my review today.

How not to be good? Let me list the ways…

Are you a woman? Do you make to-do lists to stop you losing your mind? Have you ever cried in the toilets at work, had a meltdown in the supermarket, or gone off the rails at a hen party?

And have you ever been saved from any of the above by your truly brilliant friends?

If you’ve answered ‘yes’ to any of these questions, then this is the book for you. A moving, funny and brutally honest memoir of one woman’s millennial misadventures, The To-Do List and Other Disastersfollows Amy Jones on her journeys through friendship, marriage and mental health disasters in a story that’s as relatable as it is riotous.

What does TWG think?

Have you ever walked through the street, comparing yourself to every person you went past? Have you ever assumed that someone else’s life is perfect simply because they’re not you?

‘The To-Do List’ is Amy Jones’ own personal journey with mental health. Not only does the author share her honesty regarding how she feels about her body, she also admits her sensitivities when other people look at her. Are they mad because of something she has done? Are they annoyed with her? How can she fix it? Even if Amy didn’t have a clue as to whether the person had an actual issue with her, her insecurities niggled at her to make her feel like the world and its wife was against her.

You may read this book and struggle to understand why the author is ‘creating’ problems that aren’t even there, but the thing is, that’s what mental health is all about. People with depression, anxiety, stress disorders etc, struggle to rationalise things like someone without mental health issues. We battle day in, day out, with every little thing. It doesn’t matter if we don’t want the battle because the sneaky little bastard that is mental health, takes over everything.

I do think that Amy Jones was incredibly brave to put her struggles out there, especially seeing as we are in a world where ignorance is bliss and people are too quick to assume. I found her humour enlightening and I loved how she wasn’t afraid to make light of situations even when she didn’t have the energy to do much else.

A book like ‘The To-Do List’ is a difficult book to review because the hook of the book, so to speak, is actually the authors life and it’s not like anyone can sit there and say ‘nah your life was boring’ because that’s not fair. Yeah, this book had a prominent theme, but it didn’t have the bog standard ‘grit’. Not that it should have to be honest, after all, the topic of mental health has it’s own amount of intensity to it.

I was able to relate to a lot of what Amy discussed, and I truly believe that anyone with mental health struggles, body image issues, or anything in between, would totally benefit from the authors optimism and poignant honesty.

Buy now.

#BlogTour! #Review – #TheSpaceBetweenTime by Charlie Laidlaw (@claidlawauthor) @AccentPress @AnneCater

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Many thanks to Anne Cater and Accent Press for inviting me to take part in the blog tour (and for the ARC) for ‘The Space Between Time’ by Charlie Laidlaw, I am delighted to be able to share my review with you all today!

The Space FRONT COVER

There are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on Earth…

Emma Maria Rossini appears to be the luckiest girl in the world. She’s the daughter of a beautiful and loving mother, and her father is one of the most famous film actors of his generation. She’s also the granddaughter of a rather eccentric and obscure Italian astrophysicist.

But as her seemingly charmed life begins to unravel, and Emma experiences love and tragedy, she ultimately finds solace in her once-derided grandfather’s Theorem on the universe.

The Space Between Time is humorous and poignant and offers the metaphor that we are all connected, even to those we have loved and not quite lost.

What does TWG think?

This will no doubt be a tough review for me to write, for several reasons. Firstly, my opinion on the storyline changed multiple times throughout, with me unsure at first as to whether it was ‘for me’. Secondly, the concept of this book is incredibly intricate, and I’m not too sure if I can do the book justice with my thoughts. And lastly, ‘The Space Between Time’ ended up moving me in a way I don’t think even I, Little Miss Chatterbox, could explain.

So yes, I’ve admitted that I didn’t exactly ‘get on’ with the book at first, and I think that was because I felt that the story was a bit mismatched and kept jumping to different times and different events like a little grasshopper. I found it a little difficult to put all of the puzzle pieces in order, however once I stopped reading the novel like I read every other novel, things began to make sense. Charlie Laidlaw’s book needs to be read like the unique book that it is. It cannot be compared to any other. It cannot be read knowing the path the storyline might take. It cannot be rushed, nor can it be read with a one track mind. Honestly, I had to clear my thoughts as best as I could, take a deep breath and read this book as though I was looking at the bigger picture in life. Once I did that, well, my heart was taken on its own little journey.

What I loved about ‘The Space Between Time’ was how it was set in a place not far from me, one where I have actually lived; North Berwick! When the author was describing the seaside town, or taking one of his characters past The Scottish Seabird Centre, I could envision the route very clearly and it meant that I was able to feel more in tune with the setting as I had actually stepped foot there. I also got excited when the author mentioned Aberlady and Drem train station! Daft I know, but still. It’s the little things, eh?

Emma has a life most other children could only dream of, however what may look like a picture perfect life to the outside world, is actually completely different for someone actually living it. Yes, she may be the daughter of a famous actor. Yes, she may have a huge house, staff, and the ability to have everything she could ever want, yet what she wants the most, money simply cannot buy.

There is so much to this storyline than I had originally thought, and the fact that it centred around space, the universe, and everything else in between, was such an interesting (and often confusing) concept. Heck, even the thought of time itself made me stop and think. The topic of mental health is evident throughout, and I thought the author dealt with that topic, as well as the other hard-hitting subjects in the book, beautifully and sensitively. I could feel the emotion radiating from Emma’s character. I felt the panic oozing from her mother’s personality. I felt the hurt of a young woman in immense turmoil, deep within my soul in the latter portion of the book. Emma may have had the option to fill her life with beautiful things, multiple holidays abroad and so forth, yet when someone has lost their way, no amount of money or materialistic things would put them back on the correct path.

The thought of ‘time’ really got under my skin and it got me thinking. Whenever I go out somewhere, I am always aware of time. The time we need to get our train or bus home. Lunch time. Ensuring the dog is fed at his correct time. Every step is governed by it and, thanks to ‘The Space Between Time’, I realised that I never go out anywhere and simply…..be. I don’t saunter down the street being in the moment. I don’t think ‘oh we will eat when we eat, no rush’. And you know what? I don’t like it! Yes, routine and plans are important, but I had no idea just how much I was taking ‘time’ for granted until now.

‘The Space Between Time’ is such an eye-opening, highly charged read which takes the reader on a ‘one step at time’ type journey through life and loss, turmoil and joy, happiness and sadness. Even though the book covers a few heartbreaking topics, it still is such an uplifting and moving read. I surprised myself by how much I ended up loving ‘The Space Between Time’ – I really will not be forgetting this book anytime soon.

Buy now from Amazon.

#BlogTour! #Review – #YouToo by Candy Denman (@crimecandy) @crimescenebooks @AnneCater

It’s an honour to be kicking off Candy Denman’s blog tour today – thank you to Anne Cater for inviting me to take part and for the ARC. Here is my review of #YouToo:

A partner in a successful law firm in the seaside town of Hastings dies when his penchant for erotic auto-asphyxiation apparently goes too far. The head of the Crown Prosecution Service in E Sussex is photographed drunk and undressed at a well-known dogging location. A corporate lawyer in a city finance company is found drugged and drowned in his employer s swimming pool. What is the connection between these bizarre incidents and have they been deliberately set up?

Dr Jo Hughes is convinced that there is a connection, even if the police do not agree. As she searches for the reason behind the deaths and attacks, she begins to realise that there will be more, and that Detective Inspector Steve Miller may well be the next victim.

What does TWG think?

Oh this was BRILLIANT!!!! So much grit and suspense in one place – I was hooked!!!

It was Candy Denman’s novels which cemented my intrigue for forensics, and I must say that she has outdone herself with this latest installment, thus increasing my hunger for everything forensic even more.

There is a large portion of the novel which centres around the #metoo movement, but it’s done in a way which makes you sit up and take notice. Not that anyone should ignore that sort of thing, but you know what I mean….I hope!

Hughes and Miller are a very intriguing double act, one of which both irked me and kept me hooked. They’re both good at their jobs, don’t get me wrong, I just thought their priorities ended up becoming a little bit misguided at times. However, that didn’t stop me from enjoying the book in the slightest.

Like I said, #YouToo is a gripping and incredibly brutal read, yet I truly believe that its Candy Denman’s best book yet. If you’re after a thrilling, jaw dropping read, you will be in your element with #YouToo!

Buy now.