#BlogBlitz! #GuestPost from author of #HesAtYourDoor, Alex Sinclair (@ASinclairAuthor) @BloodHoundBook

Here is a guest post from Alex Sinclair, author of ‘He’s At Your Door’, for the first day of the blog tour. Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the invite.

Karen Rainey lives a sheltered life on the edge of the city. For the last five years, she has rarely left the home unless it was unavoidable. She has her food and anything else she needs delivered to the front door. She works from home to avoid venturing outside.

But Karen isn’t agoraphobic. She’s terrified of her ex-boyfriend, Zach, who is serving a life sentence in prison for a string of bank robberies after Karen testified against him. With the constant threat that Zach might send someone to find and kill her, Karen keeps a low profile.

To aid her in paying the rent each month, Karen takes in the occasional housemate, opting for students from the local university. Her current housemate, Beth, is a young student who has no idea about Karen’s past.

But when a mysterious package is left of her doorstep, it sends Karen’s world into turmoil.

Has Zack found her?

Isolated and frightened, Karen befriends Beth but refuses to tell her everything about her past.

Trapped inside their home, Karen and Beth soon begin to lose their minds.

But is the threat really outside or is it closer to home?

Guest post.

The Five a.m. start

I’m not a morning person. When it’s dark outside before the sun rises, like most people, I’d rather be sound asleep. But when you are an author who still works a full-time job, you have little choice.

When my daughter was born a little over three years ago, she had a lot of trouble early on sleeping. We were lucky if she lasted two hours at a time despite having enough food in her belly to see her through to the next feed. Because of this, my wife and I took turns attempting to help her go back to sleep. To say it exhausted us was an understatement.

When you have your first child, nothing can prepare you for the overwhelming change your life will undertake to accommodate a tiny human’s every need. It’s amazing how such a small thing impacts not only your lifestyle but the way you see the world. Each person handles the transition differently. But for me, it was the moment I resolved to take my writing seriously and put in the hard yards.

I was up one morning around four with my daughter on my chest, trying my hardest to coax her back to sleep. I was reclined in the feeding chair with my laptop within reach. While my bundled-up daughter drifted off on me, I decided to do some writing to keep myself awake while she settled into a deep slumber. The light rattling of the keyboard seemed to help settle her. This became a nightly ritual until I realized something: I was getting more work completed than ever before.

Prior to this new and bizarre habit, I would write when I felt like it, typically at night. I’d be lucky to put down four hundred words over several hours, often distracted by the TV or my wife. It would take me six months to complete a first draft of anything. But when I wrote in the early hours of the morning, the words flowed. The absolute calm and quiet of the dark before the sun came up allowed me to move into a focused zone. Once my daughter slept through the night, I decided to get up every morning at five to spend two hours writing before work or before the day started with my family.

That was three years ago. In that time, I’ve written seven novels and three novellas while working full time and helping to raise our child. Life is busy. I had three novels published in 2018. I have another two being published in 2019 so far. It’s thanks to this seven-day-a-week writing habit. Unless something else needs to be prioritized or I’m sick, I don’t sleep in. The early starts have helped me achieve far more than I ever imagined possible and are charging me toward my goal of becoming a full-time author.

I’ll admit, it’s not an easy thing to do every day. I’ve had my difficulties. Some mornings, I can produce three thousand words in less than two hours. On others, I’m lucky if I break through to the one-thousand-word mark. But the most important factor is consistency. You must write every day if you want to improve your craft and be capable of producing anything worthy of publication. It’s no different from putting in the hours at a job. If you fail to show up consistently, you can’t expect to get ahead.

I wish I had understood the importance of treating writing like a career and not a hobby when I first started a novel back in 2011. I have my daughter to thank for showing me what was possible. I’m sure she just wanted a warm chest to snuggle into, but one day I’ll tell her how much she motivated her dad to take his writing to the next level.

Alex Sinclair

Advertisements

#BlogBlitz! #Review – The Butcher’s Daughter by Jane.E.James (@jane_e_james) @BloodHoundBook

Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blog tour invite and ARC for ‘The Butcher’s Daughter’ by Jane E James. It’s a pleasure to be hosting the author today with a review.

Trust no one. Not even yourself.

When Natalie Powers returns home for the first time in thirteen years, she must convince everyone she has fully recovered from the mental illness, which has seen her institutionalised for most of her young life.

But instead of being welcomed back, Natalie enters a baffling world of deception. She must fight her way through the lies in order to discover the truth about her mother’s sudden disappearance sixteen years earlier. To do this, Natalie must also try to make sense of the hazy memories from the past that continue to haunt her.

In the village of Little Downey, everybody appears to harbour a mysterious secret, including her father, Frank, the village butcher, who refuses to discuss the circumstances surrounding Natalie’s mother’s disappearance, but who can Natalie trust if not her own father? Especially when it becomes clear her protector and confidante, Dr Moses, is not all he appears.

Meanwhile, a spate of unexplained clifftop suicides has seen the seaside resort go into decline. Are the villagers somehow involved or is something more sinister at work?

Determined to find out what happened to her mother, Natalie must make sure her own frailty and self-doubt does not catapult her back to the mental institution before she can uncover the truth…

What does TWG think?

If you’re finding the weather a little too hot and are needing to be cooled down, you definitely won’t go wrong with this chilling, chilling read.

The topic of mental health is incredibly rife throughout the book, yet its written with such realism and sensitivity that would make the bigots of the world feel very ashamed with themselves.

Jane.E.James transported me to a very dark and sinister place which had me hooked until the very end. I was very impressed by how much detail the author incorporated into each event within the book as it made the story come to life. Granted, at times when uncomfortable things happened, I didn’t really want to feel as though I was seeing the sinister moments with my very own eyes Haha.

All in all, ‘The Butcher’s Daughter’ is a very intense, chilling and brilliant book which highlights just how talented Jane.E.James is.

Buy now.

#BlogBlitz! #Review – The Murder Mile by Lesley McEvoy (@LesleyMcEvoy20) @BloodHoundBook

Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blitz invite and ARC, I am excited to be reviewing ‘The Murder Mile’ by Lesley McEvoy today.

Forensic Psychologist, Jo McCready is assisting DCI Callum Ferguson on a murder inquiry, when one of her patients is found brutally murdered.

Jo was the last person to see Martha Scott alive. She was helping Martha unlock a repressed memory. But during the session, Jo unlocked more than she bargained for. An alter personality introduced himself as the reincarnation of Jack the Ripper – and thanked Jo for setting him free to kill again.

As Ferguson’s team race to find Martha’s killer, a series of copycat killings begin, replicating ‘The Autumn of Terror’ in 1888. But if Jack is just a figment of Martha’s damaged mind, who killed her?

As the body count rises, Jo must construct a profile to stop the murderer recreating the terror of the most infamous serial killer of all time.

But not everyone is on Jo’s side. The Police Intelligence Unit have their own profiler, Liz Taylor-Caine, who resents Jo’s involvement as a contributing expert in the case.

Suspicion about Jo’s involvement in the killings increases when someone close to the team becomes one of Jack’s victims.

And as the anniversary of the final and most gruesome of all the killings looms, Jo discovers that the killer has one murder on his mind that is far closer to home…

What does TWG think?

A debut you say?! I cannot believe that ‘The Murder Mile’ is Lesley McEvoy’s debut novel! I was beyond impressed by the storyline! The inclusion of ‘Jack the Ripper’ was an incredibly clever direction to go down, as was having a forensic psychologist as one of the main character! The more crime books I read, the more intrigued by the forensic side of things I become, and the author certainly fed my hunger with this book!

The pace of the book was on point, kept me on my toes without feeling as though the storyline had unnecessary pregnant paused. I felt as though there was a sharp chill in the air for the duration of the book, which meant that I flew through the pages because I was so eager to find out all of the nitty gritty details.

‘The Murder Mile’ is a brilliant, brilliant debut! All you readers who get to read it for the very first time are such lucky beggars – I loved it!

Buy now!

#BlogBlitz! #Review – Dark Is The Day by Tana Collins (@TanaCollins7) @BloodHoundBook

Given the weather outside, I would say that the title of the book I’m reviewing today is quite apt! Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blitz invite and ARC of ‘Dark is the Day’ by Tana Collins – here is my review:

DI Jim Carruthers has to put his personal feelings for newly- appointed DCI Sandra McTavish aside when a young student is brutally attacked and left for dead.

Meanwhile, when a university lecturer is stalked by one of her own students, Carruthers is horrified to discover that the academic is none other than his ex-wife, Mairi. Are the attacker and stalker one and the same, and if so, will Carruthers’ ex-wife be next?

When a second then a third victim is discovered, not only dead but mutilated, Carruthers and his team are tasked with searching for a murderer. A murderer who takes great pleasure from killing.

What is the victims’ connection to a cult in North America, which seems to be getting a stranglehold in a Scottish university? Why have these women been targeted? And who is doing the killing?

It looks like there might be a serial killer on the loose in Castletown but can DI Jim Carruthers stop this depraved murderer before they strike again?

What does TWG think?

Right, this will make no sense to anyone else except the people who have already read the book and of course the author – MALCOLM IS A LEGEND!!! What a man! I was in absolute hysterics at the brilliantly placed one liner that came out of his mouth during a not so funny situation. I felt bad for laughing given what was going on at the time, but I just couldn’t help myself!

‘Dark Is The Day’ is such a brilliant, dark, Scottish crime novel which had me on the edge of my seat until the very end. I really enjoyed following DI Carruthers and his team as they try to find the culprit behind the latest killings. What do the students have in common? Why is someone targeting them?

As always, I had my guesses as to whom I thought was behind the murders. But I was wrong. To be honest, the person who it turned out to be, didn’t even feature on my radar!

Tana Collins is a descriptive author who nails the crime genre incredibly. For me, there is no negatives to this book – I genuinely loved every single minute of it.

A thrilling, chilling, atmospheric and witty novel which blew me away due to it’s hilarious one liners and gritty suspense.

Buy now.

#BlogBlitz! #Review – The Paramedic’s Daughter by Tara Lyons (@taralyonsauthor) @Bloodhoundbook

Next up on TWG this afternoon is a review of ‘The Paramedic’s Daughter’ by Tara Lyons. Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blog tour invite and ARC.

Would you lie to your family to protect yourself?

Paramedic Abi Quinn is hailed as a hero by the patients she saves with the London Ambulance Service, but a secret she’s kept since she was a teenager now threatens to shatter that perfect illusion.

When her daughter Rose goes missing while studying at Brighton University, and ghosts from her past return to haunt her, Abi’s caught in a race against time to untangle the web of lies she set in motion over twenty years ago.

Everyone has something to lose.

Everyone is trying to protect themselves.

Everyone is broken.

But what lengths will they go to in order to stop the truth from being exposed?

What does TWG think?

I am struggling to digest the fact that this is Tara Lyons’ first dip into the ‘psychological thriller’ pond! I was impressed by the slow burning grit which demanded my full attention.

Abi, just like many of us, has skeletons in her closet, however when they come back to haunt her and put her daughter in the firing line, Abi isn’t sure which way she needs to turn. Being a paramedic in her day job, Abi is used to high energy events, but when the event contains someone directly linked to her, she finds herself in a bit of a muddle.

I liked the fact that the main character had a job as a paramedic; its something which I haven’t seen much of in books and it definitely made a change from the usual jobs that appear in books. The whole situation with Abi’s daughter was hard hitting and made my blood turn cold. At times I even felt as though I reacted more to her disappearance than her own mother!

Tara Lyons royally mucked up my head, and ranked my level of paranoia up several thousand notches! Honestly, the author was hitting the surprises of the park – I still don’t think my heart has recovered from it all!

What a gritty, atmospheric, thrilling read which had me second guessing everything. More please!

Buy now!

#BlogBlitz! #Review – Jaded by Rob Ashman (@RobAshmanAuthor) @Bloodhoundbook

I am so excited to be reviewing Rob Ashman’s latest novel, Jaded, today as I close the blog blitz for BloodHoundBooks. Many thanks for inviting me to take part and the ARC.

A body washes up on a Blackpool beach, tortured and shot through the head.

A man is found in an alleyway with his throat ripped open.

A woman is murdered in a hospital bed.

What connects them?

DI Roz Kray’s private life is in turmoil as she struggles to unravel a baffling case and DCI Dan Bagley is hell-bent on making her working life a misery.

Billy Ellwood is a chameleon. What forced him to disappear eighteen years ago? And what was the promise?

When Kray makes a shattering discovery it rocks her world to the core. The stakes could not be higher. She’s left with no choice.

This time … it’s all or nothing.

What does TWG think?

You know, I WAS a massive fan of Blackpool. Now….the jury is out on that one ha!!

Rob Ashman never fails to produce novels which churn my stomach and enable me to finish reading the book at the same time. Usually if a storyline created nausea of the strong variety as Mr Ashman does, I would be running from the book like a little gingerbread man, yet this author has me in chains with his words. JADED was no different. In fact, I think it cemented the fact that Ashman can write belter reads.

‘Jaded’ is a case of now you see me, now you don’t. The storyline had that cat and mouse feel to it, as well as been covered in so many red herrings it was unreal. The detail in which Ashman describes, is mind blowing, sinister, and unbelievably twisted.

I am being vague on purpose due to spoilers, but I cannot recommend this author enough. I dread to think what goes through his mind at times, however if it helps him write novels as jaw dropping as Jaded, I cant help but think he must be doing something right!

Buy now!

#BlogBlitz! #Review – Searching For Sylvia by Joanna Stephen-Ward (@OperaLover12) @bloodhoundbook

Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blitz invite and ARC, here is my review of ‘Searching For Sylvia’ by Joanna Stephen-Ward.

Sylvia has been missing for thirty years. Will her daughters ever find her?

Tordorrach is 70,000 acres of drought stricken land in the Australian outback. Why do a group of wealthy people from London want to buy it?

Shamus, the owner of Tordorrach, lives in poverty. His homestead is derelict and he is heavily in debt. The new owners run Outback Experience holidays on Tordorrach. Shamus becomes one of the gardeners, and he and his wife Mary move to a comfortable cabin on the property. Why does he hate the new owners so much that he plans to murder one of them?

The idyllic life of the new owners is shattered when the body of a woman is found buried on Tordorrach. Forensics find a bullet in her body. Who was she? And who murdered her?

What does TWG think?

‘Searching For Sylvia’ had me hooked from start to finish. This really is a storyline which keeps you guessing, makes you wonder ‘what if’, and puts an unsettled feeling in the pit of your stomach.

Set in the Australian outback, Joanna Stephen-Ward piqued my interest with her highly descriptive story telling. Instead of just reading the book, I felt as though I was transported to the setting itself, watching the journeys of the characters pan out.

Family dynamics play a big part in this book, for reasons which I won’t detail due to spoilers. However, all i will say is that, i couldn’t even begin to imagine what the Sylvia’s daughters were going through.

I throughly enjoyed the mysterious and emotive edge to the storyline. It was such a gritty book to be able to sink my teeth into, without getting confused. An absolute pleasure, and highly suspense joy to read.

Buy now.

#BlogTour! #Review – The Cleansing by J.A.Baker (@thewriterjude) @BloodHoundBook

Next up is something a bit darker, a review of ‘The Cleansing’ by J.A.Baker. Many thanks to BloodHoundBooks for the blog tour invite and ARC.

When Ray moves to a new house in the village of Whitchurch, he leaves behind a relationship and a luxury apartment in search of a better life in the countryside.

However, he soon realises that sleepy Whitchurch also has its own fair share of problems. Last year, a woman’s body was discovered in the woods nearby. The killer was never caught.

Soon suspicious things start to happen. Threatening letters are sent, cars are vandalised and headstones are desecrated. But who is responsible for these acts and why?

As the tension in the village builds, Ray begins to feel the pressure. Someone is out to cause trouble and that someone might be closer to Ray than he ever imagined.

What does TWG think?

I’ve heard a lot about Whitchurch and have envisioned myself visiting there one day, however after reading ‘The Cleansing’, I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a little apprehensive. Hah!

The main question that will no doubt cross the threshold of your brain whilst reading this book, would be ‘whodunnit??’. I would genuinely surprised if that question didn’t cross your mind at least once, because it crossed my mind like a little convoy of ducks crossing the road.

Ray has reached a time in his life where he wants peace. But at what price? With a new house and a fresh start paving the way for a new life for Ray, he can’t wait to start enjoying life. Like I said; at what price?

So many sinister and unexplained things happen throughout the book, some minor and some not, and all fingers seem to be pointing at the newcomer. Things aren’t as simple as they seem in ‘The Cleansing’, and I thought that J.A.Baker is extraordinary at creating a nail biting tension which kept me guessing until the very end.

The pace isn’t all that fast and be prepared to be drip fed snippets of information throughout the book but, most importantly, be prepared to be hooked.

Dark, dangerous, and damn right devious; ‘The Cleansing’ is even twister than a bottle of domestos with a child lock on it!

Buy now from Amazon

About the author.

J.A.BAKER was born and brought up in North East England and has had a love of language for as long as she can remember.

She enjoys reading many genres of books but especially enjoys psychological thrillers. When she’s not busy writing, she can be found trying to keep on top of her high maintenance garden!

In December 2016 she was signed by Bloodhound Books who published Undercurrent.

Her second novel, Her Dark Retreat was published in October 2017. Since then she has written four other novels – The Other Mother, Finding Eva, The Uninvited and The Cleansing which is her latest release.

J.A. Baker has four grown-up children and a grandchild and lives in a village near Darlington with her husband and madcap dog.

You find out more about J.A.Baker by visiting her website at

http://www.jabakerauthor.co.uk/

www.facebook.com/thewriterjude

www.twitter.com/thewriterjude

#BlogTour! #Review – Paper Dolls by Emma Pullar (@EmmaStoryteller) @BloodhoundBook

Happy publication day, Emma Pullar! I am delighted to be kicking off the ‘Paper Dolls’ blog tour today, many thanks to Heather and BloodHoundBooks for the tour invite and ARC. Here is my review:

When a bizarre set of murders take place in London, three flatmates become embroiled in the terrifying mystery.

Mike, Beatrice and Kerri all share a flat and a passion to move their careers forward. When Mike, a frustrated mime in Trafalgar Square, lays eyes on performance artist Princess, his world begins to unravel. Meanwhile, Kerri is struggling to hold onto her job as a journalist, when she stumbles across a body, which turns out to be the third victim of the Paper Doll Killer. Beatrice, who was once a bestselling author, looks to the series of murders for inspiration but finds a lot more than she bargained for.

As the three flatmates discover they each have links to the killer they start to turn on one another. Who might be next? Why does the killer paint the victim’s cheeks and lips with blood? What purpose do the paper dolls serve?

As the deranged Paper Doll Killer continues to stalk the streets of London there’s only one question that needs to be answered … is anyone safe?

What does TWG think?

Whatever you do, don’t judge this book by the opening chapter. Hear me out a second; the opening chapter isn’t bad at all, it is just extremely dark and circumstantially graphic. I have seen on social media that people struggled with the graphic nature of the beginning of the book, but in all honesty, when a subject contains a theme which goes on in the outside world, wouldn’t you rather the author be realistic? It’s a theme which can devastate lives, or warrant copious amounts of therapy. It isn’t a theme which can be glossed off with rainbows and glitter. So yes, be prepared to have your eyes opened, but don’t judge the entire book on it because, if you were in the position of the characters the author was describing at the start, you would feel a lot worse than discomfort at the black and white descriptions. Again, yes, I am speaking from experience.

‘Paper Dolls’ is very, very clever. The storyline is very dark and mysterious, yet its evident that the author did her research when it came to the main themes of book. I had no idea of the complexity behind certain situations and without sounding like a wuss, they unnerved me at times because I had no idea what the characters were capable of. Hell, I don’t think they even knew what they were capable of.

Mike, Kerri and Bea are so very different, and it was interesting watching their journeys unfold as the storyline progressed. I thought that the split narrative was very in keeping with the nature of the book, and I thought that it allowed the suspense to grow with every new chapter. Personally, I wasn’t too keen on the ending as I felt as though I finished the book with a massive question mark looming over my head.

Emma Pullar has written a very intriguing, well thought out, dark and vice like novel – I thoroughly enjoyed the uniqueness of the book. If you’re looking for something different and intense, I cannot recommend ‘Paper Dolls’ enough.

Buy now!

About the author.

Emma Pullar is an award-winning and bestselling writer of dark fiction and children’s books. Her picture book, Curly from Shirley, was a national bestseller and named best opening lines by NZ Post. Her second picture book, Kitty Stuck, was illustrated by her talented daughter who was just twelve-years-old at the time. Four of Emma’s short stories have been published. Her dystopian duology, Skeletal and Avian, are popular with fans of the genre and Emma’s crime debut is out March 2019. She also writes articles for Bang2write and dabbles in screenwriting. Find her on Twitter @EmmaStoryteller or Instagram @emmapullar_storyteller or http://www.emmapullar,com.

#BlogTour! #Extract from #BadSeed by Heleyne Hammersley (@hhammersley66) @BloodHoundBook @LifeBookish

Stepping in last minute to take part in the Bloodhound Books blog tour for ‘Bad Seed’ by Heleyne Hammersley. Before I share an extract, here is a little bit more about the and the all important ‘buy’ link:

When the body of a woman is discovered near Doncaster’s red light district, DI Kate Fletcher is called to the scene. 

The victim has an abdominal wound that looks like a Caesarean incision, leading the police to believe she may have been pregnant.

Kate’s team establish the woman’s identity but it soon becomes clear that those close to her have something to hide.

The post-mortem reveals the victim wasn’t pregnant and, when a second body is discovered with similar wounds, the police realise they are hunting for a serial killer with a sinister fixation.

Can Kate solve the case before another woman dies?

And can a ruthless, methodical killer be brought to justice?

Buy now from Amazon UK

Extract.

DI Kate Fletcher unbuttoned her jacket, breathing heavily in the humid air as she studied the scene in front of her. The body of a woman was lying on her back amid the lush vegetation which bounded much of Doncaster’s Town Fields like the hair around a monk’s tonsure. The body was surrounded by crimescene technicians who continued their work as Kate approached. She kept back beyond the blue-and-white crimescene tape and followed the step plates with her eyes, knowing that she wouldn’t be welcome to approach until she’d donned protective clothing.

She could make out dark hair and pale limbs but little else from where she was standing, as the body had been dumped amongst nettles and cow parsley that were as high as Kate’s waist in full June growth.

‘What have we got?’ she asked the nearest overall-clad figure. He turned to face her and she recognised her colleague, DC Barratt. He took a couple of steps towards her and lowered the hood of his overalls, messing up his hair and revealing patches of pink scalp through the thinning strands.

‘Body of a woman. Looks like she’s about thirty or so. Undressed from the waist down so possible sexual assault, but obviously we won’t know until the test results are back.’

‘Cause of death?’ Kate asked.

Barratt glanced round at the other people attending and then lowered his voice. ‘They haven’t been able to establish that yet but there’s a whacking great wound in her abdomen. They were just debating whether it was pre- or post-mortem when you arrived. There’s also bruising round her neck and throat so strangulation’s another possibility.’

Kate nodded and glanced again at the body. She was tempted to find a set of overalls and get a closer look but she didn’t want to undermine Barratt. She knew that there would be photographs and notes and she also knew that Barratt’s report would be fastidiously detailed.

‘Who found her?’

Barratt gestured to a support van parked on the running track that went around the top section of the field. A man in sports clothes was sitting on the back step, nursing a cardboard cup of something that Kate hoped was hot and sweet. Another of her DCs, Hollis, was standing next to the van but he didn’t appear to be talking to the man.

‘Bloke over there with Hollis. He was setting up a football training session for a team of pre-teens. Does it at weekends and in the school holidays. Thankfully he found the body before the kids arrived.’

Kate thanked Barratt and crossed the grass to the van where the man had stopped studying his drink and was looking up at her expectantly.

‘DI Fletcher,’ Kate introduced herself. ‘I understand that you found the body?’

He nodded and stood up, holding out his hand, which Kate ignored. ‘Duncan Cawthorne.’

‘Okay, Duncan. I want you to tell me what happened this morning. My colleague, DC Hollis, will make notes if that’s all right with you?’

Cawthorne watched as Hollis took a notebook and pencil from the inside breast pocket of his suit jacket. ‘I get down here early on a Sunday,’ he began. ‘Have a bit of a run and then set up for the kids.’

Kate appraised him as she listened to his account of arriving at the car park, jogging for half an hour and then retrieving the cones and balls from his car so he could set up a course for ‘the kids’. He was probably in his early thirties, well built and tall. He was wearing baggy grey tracksuit bottoms and a zip-up red hoody with a Doncaster Rovers badge below the left shoulder. His hair was hidden under a tight-fitting grey beanie hat with DRFC emblazoned across the front. He’d obviously dressed for his role as a football coach. His broad face was clean-shaven and tanned – Kate suspected a sunbed or a spray considering the grey cloud that seemed to have enveloped Doncaster for much of the spring and early summer.

‘And then I saw her,’ Cawthorne was saying. ‘Just lying on her back in the bushes.’

Kate glanced across to the police tape. It was a few hundred yards away from the neat row of miniature traffic cones that had been set up next to the running track. She looked at Hollis. He’d stopped making notes and was looking at where the body lay. He’d also spotted the anomaly.

About the author.

Heleyne Hammersley is a British writer based in Cumbria. She writes psychological suspense thrillers and crime novels.

Heleyne has been writing since junior school – her first work was a collection of poems called ‘Give Them the Works’ when she was ten years old. The poems were carefully handwritten on plain paper and tied together with knitting wool. 

When she’s not writing, Heleyne can often be found wandering on the fells or in the local park with her dog.