Kicking off the #AFatalSecret #blogtour with an #extract! @HQStories @FaithMartin_Nov

A Fatal Secret Blog Tour Banner
Many thanks to the HQ team for inviting me to take part in the blog tour for Faith Martin and ‘A Fatal Secret’. I have an extract from the book for you all to enjoy, but first here is a little bit more about Faith Martin’s latest read:

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Oxford, 1961

A family day out at Briar’s Hall ends in tragedy when a young boy goes missing – and his body is found at the bottom of a disused well in the orchard.

It looks like a simple case of an eleven-year-old exploring where he shouldn’t: a tragic accident. But Coroner Clement Ryder and Probationary WPC Trudy Loveday aren’t convinced. If Eddie had been climbing and fallen, why were there no cuts or dirt on his hands? Why would a boy terrified of heights be around a well at all?

Clement and Trudy are determined to get to the truth, but the more they dig into Briar’s Hall and the mysterious de Lacey family who live there, the murkier things become.

Could it be that poor Eddie’s death was murder? There are rumours of blackmail in the village, and Clement and Trudy have a horrible feeling that Eddie stumbled on a secret that someone was willing to kill for…

‘A Fatal Secret’ is the fourth book in the ‘Ryder and Loved’ series – buy now from Amazon.

Extract.

Oxford, England. 1st April 1961.

It was a lovely Saturday morning, and less than three miles away as the crow flies
from the city of dreaming spires, someone was contemplating how ironical it was that
it should be April Fool’s Day.

The daffodils were just beginning to bud in the small woods surrounding Briar’s
Hall. Birds were busy building their nests, and a weak and watery sun was promising
that spring really was on its way.

But the person leaning against a still-bare ash tree, moodily observing the fine
Georgian building below, cared little for the promise of bluebells to come.
That person was thinking of only one thing: death, and how best to bring it about.
Perhaps, not surprisingly, that person was feeling not at all happy. Not only was
death on its own something that you would never consider in detail unless given
absolutely no choice, contemplating cold-blooded murder was even more unpleasant.
Not least, of course, because if you were caught at it, you’d be hanged. Which was
terrifying.

And yet death – and murder – there would have to be. The person in the woods
could see no other way out.

Which instilled in that person’s heart yet another, stronger emotion. Rage.
It was simply not fair!

But then, as the person in the woods had already learned very well indeed, life had
no interest in being fair.

A woodpecker struck up its rat-a-tat-tat drumming on an old dead horse chestnut
tree deeper in the woods, its resonance vibrating through the air. But the human
occupant of the wood barely noticed it.

Tomorrow, the silent watcher in the woods thought, would be a good day for it.
With so much happening, there was bound to be confusion, which would almost
certainly provide the best opportunity for action.

Yes. Tomorrow someone would have to die.

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