#BlogTour! #Review – Dangerous Crossing by Rachel Rhys (@MsTamarCohen) @PenguinRHUK

Dangerous Crossing Blog Tour Poster
Huge thanks to Anne Cater and Penguin Books for inviting me to be involved with the paperback blog tour for ‘Dangerous Crossing’ by Rachel Rhys! I’m thrilled to be sharing my review with you all today:

Dangerous Crossing Cover
*NOW A RICHARD AND JUDY BOOK CLUB PICK 2017* ‘The pages turn themselves!’

Shortlisted for the HWA Gold Crown 2017

A stunning, atmospheric novel in the great tradition of Death on the Nile and Patricia Highsmith, which tells of a young girl’s terrifying journey trapped on a cruise liner to Australia at the brink of the Second World War.

England, September 1939
Lily Shepherd boards a cruise liner for a new life in Australia and is plunged into a world of cocktails, jazz and glamorous friends. But as the sun beats down, poisonous secrets begin to surface. Suddenly Lily finds herself trapped with nowhere to go …

Australia, six-weeks later
The world is at war, the cruise liner docks, and a beautiful young woman is escorted onto dry land in handcuffs.

What has she done?

What does TWG think?

As a HUGE fan of historical fiction novels, ‘Dangerous Crossing’ had been on my radar for a while –  I was SO glad that being involved in the blog tour would give me the well needed kick up the youknowwhat to finally get it read. It worked, obviously.

Set in 1939 around the time of the Second World War, ‘Dangerous Crossing’ is an intense novel about one woman’s journey to a fresh start. However, due to the Second World War making itself known anytime soon, ‘fresh start’ couldn’t be further from the truth if it tried.

The storyline captured my attention almost straight away as I felt like I was being summoned into an unknown realm. To be honest the main character, Lily, came across as if she didn’t have a clue either. I felt as though the storyline was keeping its cards close to its chest for multiple chapters which meant that the storyline just oozed complexity. The author was determined to set the scene which, as we all know, is not a bad thing, but due to the high levels of information given in such a short space of time, I did feel a little bit overwhelmed by it all. I really do enjoy savouring novels, especially when the storyline has an air of mystery to it like ‘Dangerous Crossing’ does, and I truly feel that this novel needs to have the readers full attention from the first page until the last. I wouldn’t advise beginning this book in-between feeding time at the zoo, purely because every single detail needs to be digested at the time just so you can fully appreciate the authors work and the atmospheric storyline.

What I loved most about this novel was how the entire storyline was built on secrets. Every character seemed to have a secret. Every scenario within the storyline seemed to be reliant on a secret. Even though I knew fine well that I should have been savouring ‘Dangerous Crossing’ so that I could stop feeling so overwhelmed, I ended up turning the pages at record speed, JUST so I could find out what the secrets were, why there was a woman taken away in handcuffs and so forth. As stupid as this sounds, I didn’t know who to trust, but I was determined as hell to get to the bottom of the goings on, regardless of how confused I became.

Overall, ‘Dangerous Crossing’ is such a fascinating and mysterious read which kept me guessing until the very end. Full of rollercoaster moments, more secrets than an episode of Jeremy Kyle, and the feeling of actually being in 1939; ‘Dangerous Crossing’ is guaranteed to keep your attention peaked in one way or another. Whilst I did find the sheer force of information a bit confusing at times, nothing can fault Rachel Rhys on writing such an intense and magnetic storyline.

Huge thanks to the author, Penguin Books & Anne Cater.

Buy now from Amazon UK

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One thought on “#BlogTour! #Review – Dangerous Crossing by Rachel Rhys (@MsTamarCohen) @PenguinRHUK

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