#BlogTour! #Review #TheThingsWeThoughtWeKnew by @mahsudasnaith @TransworldBooks @Thomassshill

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Day nine of #TheThingsWeThoughtWeKnew blog tour, courtesy of Thomas Hill @ Transworld Books, is with me; TWG! It is such an honour to be able to share my review of such an eye-opening novel. Big thanks to Thomas Hill for asking me to be part of Mahsuda Snaith’s blog tour.

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Ravine and Marianne were best friends. They practised handstands together, raced slugs and went into the woods to play.

But now everything has changed.

Ten years later, Ravine lies in a bed plagued by chronic pain syndrome. And her best friend Marianne is gone.

How did their last adventure go so wrong? Who is to blame? And where is Marianne?

Heartbreaking, bittersweet and utterly unforgettable, The Things We Thought We Knew is a powerful novel about the things we remember and the things we wish we could forget.

What does TWG think?

This review may be brief as there isn’t a lot that I can say without giving anything away, but I will do my best.

The Things We Thought We Knew is centred around Ravine and her chronic pain syndrome, as well as a memory she just cannot forget. There seem to be a limited amount of books which cover chronic, invisible illnesses within their storyline. So, when I realised that Mahsuda Snaith had included just that, I actually became a little emotional.

Why?

Because it’s a subject which is severely misunderstood, yet a lot of people like to assume and judge. I have seven chronic illnesses and one of my branch off symptoms includes this, chronic pain syndrome. To see your daily battle (well, one of) written in black and white was incredibly surreal. ‘At last!’ I thought to myself, maybe people would stop the judgemental comments. Not only was it surreal, it was quite difficult to actually read. I mean, I was sitting there reading this book, reading about a topic I know all too well, thinking to myself ‘that.is.like.me’. That was quite hard. Whilst I applaud the author for approaching such a controversial subject and putting it out there, I found the latter part of Ravine’s syndrome to be a bit ‘that’s why we are judged’. I do apologise for being vague, but I really don’t want to give anything away. Let’s just say that a certain part of Ravine’s story ended up being a tad unbelievable in my eyes, unfortunately.

However, when the storyline took another direction involving Ravine’s best friend, as well as other complex characters, the book felt a bit like Pandora’s box! I wanted to know more yet I was unsure on what I might discover, yet I couldn’t resist delving deeper into the storyline. A Pandora’s box ft. a treasure chest style story. That is the only way that I can describe it without going ‘well what about the part when…’!

Mahsuda Snaith really has written such an eye-opening and emotional read. The Things We Thought We Knew is a book which requires attention, devotion, and an open mind. A book which you may relate to. A book which may leave you with a hand print over your mouth. A book that, despite some challenging circumstances, it would be incredibly difficult to put down and leave unfinished.

I want to thank the author for including the chronic pain syndrome in her storyline, and for being the voice of many.

Thanks Thomas Hill & Transworld Books.

Buy now from Amazon UK

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2 thoughts on “#BlogTour! #Review #TheThingsWeThoughtWeKnew by @mahsudasnaith @TransworldBooks @Thomassshill

  1. I have this one to read Kaisha, I didn’t know all that much about it to be honest but I’m definitely moving it to the requires immediate attention shelf. Fantastic review – I understand how it can be difficult when a book is so close to home, but you reviewed it beautifully and honestly. XXX

    Liked by 1 person

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